Tag Archives: Michelle Gellis

AACGELLIS02212024HD Thumb

Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance – Facial Motor Point Use for Cosmetic Applications Part 2

 

 

Today’s talk focuses on facial motor points. Last time, if you missed part one, I talked about using facial motor points for cosmetic applications. And today we are gonna be talking about so cosmetic applications like, Crow’s feet or frown lines.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name is Michelle Gellis and I am an acupuncture physician who teaches facial acupuncture classes internationally. Today, I will be presenting part. Two of a lecture on using facial motor points for facial concerns, and if you would please go to the first slide.

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance

This is a list of the different classes that I teach. They are all recorded and on my website, and today we will be going over some of the. Topics that I cover in treating neuromuscular facial conditions and some of the advanced techniques from my facial acupuncture class.

Today’s talk focuses on facial motor points. Last time, if you missed part one, I talked about using facial motor points for cosmetic applications. And today we are gonna be talking about so cosmetic applications like, Crow’s feet or frown lines. But today I am going to be talking about using facial motor points for a couple of different types of neuromuscular facial conditions, and the two that I’m going to discuss today are Bell’s Palsy and Ptosis.

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

But first I wanna review quickly. What is a motor point? If a muscle. Is not functioning properly. Using an acupuncture needle and putting it into the motor point of the muscle is like a reset switch and it will bring the muscle back into normal functioning. Because on our face, the skin is attached to the muscle.

Using the motor points on the face can help the face to not only look, differently getting rid of tension and wrinkles and lines and folds, but it can also help the face to function properly so that if someone has some sort of a neuromuscular facial condition, using the motor point can help to resolve that.

A motor point is different than a trigger point. A trigger point is like a knot in a muscle, whereas a motor point is, so if this is your peripheral nerve, you have your sensory nerve, and then you have your motor nerve, and the motor point is where the motor. Attaches into the muscle. It is the most electrically excitable part of the muscle where the motor nerve is attached.

The face has two nerve branches that are in charge of the functioning and the sensory of the face. So we have the trigeminal nerve, which is. The fifth facial nerve CN five, and that takes care of sensation. And also mastication, it connects to your massacre, the facial nerve which is CN seven, cranial nerve seven.

Helps the functioning of the face, so your facial expressions and also taste. So you can see the two different nerves. We have the facial nerve and the trigeminal nerve. And the trigeminal nerve has the ophthalmic branch, the maxillary branch, and the mandibular branch, and the facial nerve has five.

Branches, the temporal zygomatic, bcal, the mandibular branch, and then the cervical branches which go down to the platysma.

The first neuromuscular condition we’re going to talk about is Bell’s Palsy and. Be’s palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis that you will find in your treatment room, that you’ll see in your treatment room typically, and it’s a disruption of the facial nerves, and it can result in facial paralysis, weakness, drooping, inability to keep the eyelid open or closed.

You can patients can get unusual taste sensations, hearing loss, ear pain and normally the symptoms get at their peak within 48 hours and can last for several weeks up through a lifetime.

Palsy is typically in Western medicine. It’s typically thought of as a result of a virus and, mostly it is seen in individuals between the ages of 15 and 60, although I have seen patients as young as two in my treatment room with Bell’s Palsy, and it usually follows some sort of a viral infection.

It is seen. In a very large number of pregnant women and Western medicine treats it with drugs such as Acyclovir. And also usually so the acyclovir is an antiviral, and then frequently they will give some sort of a steroid to help with any inflammation. So the first thing you would do is an exam protocol, and in order to ascertain which of the muscles is not.

Functioning properly. So you would look at, for example, the frontals. The way you would determine if that is working properly is you’d have your patient raise their eyebrows, close their eyes, and you’re going to be looking for any disparity between the two eyes. Have them smile, and this is going to let you know how the zygomaticus major and minor.

Functioning the orbicularis, orus, the lator muscles, and ZOS. Et cetera, et cetera. So you’re gonna go through the exam of the different facial muscles and you’re going to look for any disparity, and then you will know which muscles to treat, and then within that muscle group. Where the different motor points are, and fortunately for us, the motor points on the face, most of them are either on an acupuncture point or they’re right between a couple of acupuncture points.

So it makes it easier for us to find them because the muscle, the face does have a lot of muscles.

So the first motor point that we would use if someone could not pull their eyebrows together and frown would be the motor point for the corrugator muscle, which is just lateral to bladder two.

The next, as I mentioned the frontals that raises the eyebrows and the motor point for that is gallbladder 14. So you would treat the affected side for the orbicularis oculi. This can help with. Closing the eyelids, and that can sometimes be a problem. People with Bell’s Palsy, they have to take their eyelids shut and the motor points.

There’s two for each eye, and one is between Sania 23 and gallbladder one, and then the other is the extra point Q Hoag, which is right on the orbital Ri. It’s between stomach two and gallbladder one. The next is the motor point for the Zygomaticus major, and that is SI 18, and you’re going to needle into the muscle, but not through the muscle.

The Zygomaticus minor helps to elevate the lip and the motor point for that is between stomach two and stomach three. For the levator Labii Superioris, the motor point is between LI 20 and stomach two, and the levator labii Superioris helps to elevate the lip individually as if snarling the Tallis, is on either side of Ren 24 and it is a half soon lateral to Ren 24, and this helps to elevate and protrude the lower lip.

So in addition to ascertaining which muscles you’re going to treat. If you were treating a condition such as Bell’s Palsy, you also would want to do a full body treatment. And so you would do your TCM diagnosis and look for the pattern and treat the underlying pattern. In the case of Bell’s Palsy, it is either blood stagnation, a lung wind invasion, or a spleen chi deficiency.

And then you would do local points and motor points on the face where the person has the deficiency. In addition to any body points, posis is another neuromuscular facial condition that. You will see commonly in your treatment room, and it can affect one eye or both eyes. It’s when the eye lids are not opening fully.

Everyone has a little bit of ptosis, but it can happen as we age. Some people are born that way and for others it can happen after some sort of an injury or even an illness. And this these are different levels of ptosis. This is slight ptosis, very slight ptosis. And this is due to aging. And then this is more severe ptosis.

I already went through all of this. There are many different causes of ptosis again people, sometimes people get ptosis when they have cluster headaches and, some sort of brain injury as I mentioned injury. A brain injury, spinal cord injury can cause ptosis as well. The motor points that you would use ver posis are the orbicularis oi, and also the frontalis can help the major muscle that’s involved.

Is the levator muscle, but there is no motor point for that. There is a way to treat it with cosmetic threading techniques, but I cover that in my cosmetic classes. When you’re looking at posis of the upper eyelid, it’s either a deficiency of spleen. And kidney or and or spleen deficiency with wind phlegm or oh, I’m sorry.

Let me back up a step. The slide is confusing. The it’s either a spleen deficiency with wind phlegm. Or a deficiency of spleen and kidney. And so the, you would do your differential diagnosis based on what the symptoms are, and then you would treat the underlying symptoms accordingly, as well as using the motor points.

This is information on how to find me if you are interested in. More information. You can follow me on Instagram or join my Facebook group, facial Acupuncture and my website for all of my recorded and live classes I do teach internationally is facial acupuncture classes.com.

I wanted to say thank you for today for coming, and thank you to the American Acupuncture Council for giving me this opportunity to spend some time teaching you.

 

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

AACGELLIS01242024HD Thumb

Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance – Facial Motor Point Use for Cosmetic Applications Part 1

 

 

And today I am going to speak to you, I’m doing part one of a lecture on facial motor points.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name’s Michelle Gellis. I’m an acupuncture physician specializing in facial and cosmetic acupuncture classes. And today I am going to speak to you, I’m doing part one of a lecture on facial motor points. Can you go to the first slide please?

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance

So the title of this talk is Facial Motor Point, use for Cosmetic Applications, and in part two I’m going to talk about a little bit about facial motor points for neuromuscular facial conditions. Here is some of my publications from the Journal of Chinese Medicine. And I’ll put links up at the end to my social where you can actually view some of these publications.

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

And these are all the classes I teach today. The Motorpoint lecture will focus on treating neuromuscular facial conditions and some of my advanced techniques. Motor points have been used for a very long time, not just by acupuncturists. They’ve also been used by medical doctors and they. Date way back to the late 18 hundreds.

And more recently some acupuncturists and other physicians have been using facial motor points for neuromuscular facial concerns. So what is a motor point? When a muscle is either in spasm or in a flacid state. It is not firing properly, and if you take an acupuncture needle and insert it properly into the muscle’s motor point, it will cause the muscle to jump and reset it into normal function.

So this is what motor nerve looks like here. So this would be a sensory nerve going out to the skin and here’s a motor nerve going to the muscle, but in. With our face, the muscle is actually connected to the skin, so when you reset the muscle, it can help to enhance the appearance of the skin.

Now, motor points are not trigger points, mo trigger points or sore spots and muscles, but. Fortunately for us, many motor points are acupuncture points on the face. So it makes it easy for us to find them. So here’s a, just a picture of bone and muscle. And on the face, the muscle is connected directly to our skin, which is why we can move the scan.

On our face. So again, if the muscle is pulled tight, then the skin will wrinkle. So when we’re thinking of neuromuscular facial conditions, when we’re looking at the motor points, the face is innervated by two nerves, CN seven, and. Also the trigeminal nerve. So when you’re using facial motor points, they are wonderful for any conditions involving paralysis.

And what you do is you needle into the muscle, but not through the muscle. So on most of the face, you’re going to go on an oblique angle about a quarter to a half an inch into the muscle. And facial motor points will treat the muscle and the fascia, and this can help to enhance the appearance of the skin unless it’s some sort of a skin disease discoloration or a scoring.

So when might you use motor points if you’re doing cosmetic acupuncture? As someone who practices cosmetic acupuncture extensively, I always start with basic cosmetic acupuncture treatments and if they, my patient has a difficult to treat. Concern then I will use these motor points to help to enhance the effectiveness of my facial acupuncture treatment.

So here is what a face looks like as it’s aging. We have nasal labial folds, chin wrinkles. You can get loss of volume in the temples, we get lines between our eyebrows. The face can hollow, the jaw contours change. And we can get wrinkles in our chin and neck and also sagging underneath the neck.

So here would be an example of someone who’s not showing many signs of aging and then coming into their fifties, some signs of aging, and then more advanced signs of aging. So let’s talk about some specific types of wrinkles that you might see in your treatment room and when using cosmetic acupuncture motor points might be beneficial.

So one of those. Would be forehead wrinkles. And frequently an individual will have forehead wrinkles because their frontalis muscle has become very tight. And even when they feel like they’re relaxing their forehead and they’re not making an expression, the muscle itself is very tight. And the. Folds in the skin remain there.

So by relaxing the frontalis muscle, the entire forehead will relax and it will smooth out the wrinkles. Also treating the frontals can help to lift the lid, the eyebrows and also the eye lid at the same time. This was a patient of mine who came to me and she was noticing her brows were starting to descend as she was getting older, and so I treated just the left her left.

Eyebrow and I used the frontals muscle, and you can see after one treatment, when the muscle relaxed, the skin laid flat and it pulled the skin up into a more normal functioning for her.

So here we have the frontals muscle and the motor point for the frontals is fortunately for us, easy to find gallbladder 14. So if you wanted to work with the frontals muscle and the, again, the frontalis muscle wrinkles the forehead, it raises the eyebrows up and. What you would do is you would put the the needle straight in on a very slight oblique angle.

And you’re going to go into the muscle, but not through the muscle. Depending on how thick their forehead skin is, would determine how deep you have to go before you hit the muscle. So here’s a quick video. I had a patient who had Bell’s Palsy and they could not raise their eyebrows and they could not fully open their eye because of the Bell’s Palsy.

So I had put this needle in and stimulated it. And you can see the needle started moving immediately after the needle went in. And I put the needle right in the motor point. Is another example of when you might use a facial motor point would be if someone had very stubborn lines between their eyebrows, either the two or the one we call them frown lines, and we would needle the corrugator.

Muscle and the motor point for that is just lateral to bladder two. And it’s right in the corrugator muscle. The corrugator muscle pulls along with the procerus, pulls the eyebrows together very strongly,

and you would also, whoops. I have a little delay here. You would also needle the motor point for the processis, which is yin tongue, and when you’re using it as a motor point, you’re going to needle it slightly towards the nose.

Another area that. Motor points are very beneficial for is treating wrinkles in the chin. And as we age, these chin wrinkles or chin dimples can be more noticeable because the mentalis muscle and the depressor ang oris muscle, they can become. They don’t function as well. And so by doing the Le Depressor, Labi, inferior Aus and or the Mentalis and or the Depressor, angular Aus, all of these muscles are going to work together to cause that issue.

But. I’m showing you the de depressor, Labi inferiors and the motor point for that is the extra point. One soon lateral to this extra point here. And the way you. Oh. I’ll show you that in a second. And then medial to that is the mentalis and the motor point for that is a half a soon lateral to Ren 24.

So here is a video. And this was a patient, another patient who had Bell’s Palsy. And I had put the needle in the mentalis. And as you can see, when I stimulated the needle, the muscle jumped and my patient reported back to me that. The issue that she had been having with drooling when she was like brushing her teeth, she couldn’t spit she couldn’t drink through a straw and she had Bell’s palsy many years prior.

But still in this one side, she had issues.

Lip wrinkles can be treated very effectively with facial motor points. We would needle the motor points around the orbicularis orus, and there’s two of them on each side of the mouth. One is LI 19, and then the other one is between stomach four and Ren 24. So it’s like right here. Some other uses for facial motor points would be points on some of the muscles pertaining to the levator muscles and the oculis oculi.

So the lator muscles in the face, on the cheeks. Will if they’re not functioning properly, along with some of the tendons and other things, but can contribute to the nasal labial folds, the motor point for the rezos. If you treat that, it can help. With the little marionette lines, there are motor points for the neck that can help with the necklace lines and the neck bands.

And then there are motor points around the eyes, which I go over all of the motor points on the face in my classes. But there’s motor points around the orbicularis oculi that can help with crow’s feet. In part two of this lecture, I will go over facial motor point usage to treat neuromuscular facial conditions like Bell’s Palsy, Ramsey Hunt Syndrome, TMJ Hemi Facial Spasm, and others.

If you’re interested in checking out my classes, you can go to facial acupuncture classes.com and my social is for Instagram, it’s Michelle Gillis and Facebook. You can look up my Facebook group, which is facial acupuncture. Thank you so much.

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

AACGELLIS12132023HD Thumb

Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance – Treating Neuromuscular Facial Conditions Part 2

 

So the topics we are going to cover today are facial motor points. Facial cupping and Gua Sha and derma rolling and protocols for treating specific conditions.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name’s Michelle Gellis. I am an acupuncture physician practicing in sunny Florida, and today I am going to do a presentation. This is part two of a two part. Presentation on an overview of treating neuromuscular facial conditions. I teach a two-day class on this subject, and I am going to be presenting some of the highlights for you today.

So if we can go to the first slide.

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance?

So the topics we are going to cover today are facial motor points. Facial cupping and Gua Sha and derma rolling and protocols for treating specific conditions. In part one, I went through, Scalp, acupuncture and submuscular needling as some techniques that can be used to help with neuromuscular facial conditions such as Bell’s palsy, trigeminal neuralgia, TMJ, stroke, Ms.

Myasthenia Gravis, ptosis, and others. And today I’m going to touch on a couple of other techniques plus, um, some protocol specific conditions. So the first is facial motor points. And facial motor points. I’m sorry, motor points are, places in a muscle where if you needle them, it acts like a reset switch for the muscle.

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

So if the muscle is in spasm and it’s lost its ability to function properly, or if the muscle is overly tense or overly relaxed, if you needle into the motor point. It acts like a reset switch and it will bring the muscle back into normal functioning. And motor points are not trigger points or source spots.

And Chinese medicine, we call them Ashi points, but motor point is where the nerve bundle actually enters. Muscle. And fortunately for us, many motor points on the face are actually acupuncture points. So an example of a facial motor point are the. Facial motor points for the mentalis and the mentalis muscles are on either side of, uh, Ren 24.

And what they do are they help to elevate and protrude the up the lower lip like this, and they can also wrinkle the skin of the chin. Like that, and they are a half a soon lateral to Ren 24. And here in the picture you can see I put little diamonds to delineate where they are and where the muscle is.

And you would needle through the skin into the muscle, but not through the muscle itself.

Here is a very short video. I was teaching a cosmetic acupuncture class and in my cosmetic acupuncture class I was doing a demonstration and of cosmetic acupuncture, and my student mentioned that she had Bell’s Palsy many years previously. And as a result, she had lost some of the inability on one side of her face to purse her lips.

And if she, uh, she couldn’t whistle, if she brushed her teeth, uh, she would have trouble spitting ’cause she could only . Do this on one side, drinking through a straw was difficult, and so in addition to doing some of the cosmetic points I put in the motor point for the mentalis and this is what happened.

So you can see as soon as I put the needle in her chin started to twitch, and then once I stimulated it, the muscle really started to fire, which was very interesting. And she reported back to me that after that treatment, some of the issues that she had been having had resolved themselves. So motor points can be very beneficial when in with conditions wherein your patient, it has lost motor function of one of the muscles on the face.

And this is really apparent with the face because. On our face, the skin is directly connected to the muscles, which is why we can move the skin on our face without having to actually move a muscle. I’m sorry. We can move the skin on our face without having to move a joint or a ligament or tendon.

All we have to do is move the muscle and the skin moves.

aNother technique that can be used to help with neuromuscular facial conditions is utilizing facial cupping and guha. Now, facial cupping and guha has many similarities to the cupping and sha that you would use on the body, but you would use specialized tools that are designed for the face.

And you don’t wanna leave any marks on the face or neck when you are practicing. The facial cupping in Gua will bring blood and cheese circulation to the muscles, which will help with muscle movement. Brings qi and blood to the skin, which helps with . Cosmetic conditions and can also help if the fascia is very tight.

If there are fascial adhesions, it can help with that and . Any nerves that have become entrapped in facial tissue or within the fascia, it can help to release them. Facial cupping helps to move out stagnant lymph fluids, toxins. And if your patient has rosacea or any discoloration of the skin, facial cupping can be very beneficial for that.

And lastly, it helps to strengthen the vascular integrity of the face, increasing the blood flow, and helping with both neurological and muscular conditions of the face. So this is what fascia looks like and. Nerves will run through the fascia and they can become entrapped. Within the fascia. So using tiny facial cups and, uh, special oil that’s designed for cupping for the face, you can stimulate

The cup, the facial acupuncture points. You can glide the cups. You can stimulate the points again, and then you can use these xs symbolize a suctioning and releasing down the SCM under the clavicle into the lymphatic system. And this can really help, as I mentioned, with all of these different skin conditions.

And with facial guha, you’re actually taking specialized tools. These are jade, guha stones that are used to break up fas adhesions, stimulate acupuncture points and increase blood flow in the face. So here is a demo. This is a very abbreviated, demo a little facial cupping in Guha. I am a licensed board certified acupuncturist, and today I’m going to be demonstrating how to do facial cupping and guha.

The first step is to do a lymphatic drainage. Just ask your patient to turn the head to the side. And you’re going to start behind the ear and you’re going to work your way down and across underneath the clavicle times. I start right around Triple Energizer 17. Work my way down. right down the SCM. Now, it’s important when you’re doing this to not drag the cup down the neck or up the neck.

You’re gonna be using a suctioning and releasing until you get to the clavicle, and then you go right underneath the clavicle lung. Two area three movements that we’ll do. One is . A kind of a, like a dragging of the cup. So you would suction the cup and then move it and release it. Another one is a suction and release and just on a point.

And the other is would be like here where you’re dragging the cup. So sometimes you drag, sometimes you suction. And drag, and sometimes you just suction depending on where you’re working, like five and six, seven, and get right on up to stomach eight, just like this and up like that. guHa tools that I like to use are

Shaped like thickly, do both sides of the face at once. Whereas with the cupping, I just do the one side and then the other side, I just showed you the one side. With the gua, I do both sides of the face simultaneously, it feels better for the patient sides of the tool, and you’re really gonna sculpt the jawline, massaging acupuncture points along the way.

So stomach four. Stomach five and then coming along just like that. It’s a great way to help with the saggy gels. You can end with a little massage on small intestine 19 and work on the cheeks, and you can sculpt up this way and this way, and then get right into large intestine 20. And into stomach three, out to small intestine right here.

And bring the tools out, do gallbladder too. So essentially everything you’ve done with the cups, you are reinforcing with the guha tools and it can look like this and like this, and it feels really great. . foR your patients, it helps to break up any fa fascia that might be tense and really just those gels that might be sagging.

All the fat that falls down here, you can really move it back up.

I am. So again, this was just a little I am brief overview. I. I teach individual classes on cupping and guha, cosmetic, acupuncture, neuromuscular and all of these are brought together to help, to nourish the skin, the muscles, the nerves on the face. This is these are the tools that . I was using in my demo.

It’s a cupping and guha kit. It comes with glass cups and these jade guha tools. And there’s instructions, um, on the box and under the box. And there are also video instructions that come with it. And, you can learn about all of this@facialacupunctureclasses.com. Derma Rolling is another really wonderful tool.

So the nice thing about the cupping sets is these can be sold to your patients and you can teach your patients how to do self-care at home. In between. Treatments. So if they come to see you, if they can only come in to see you once a week, this is self-care for your patients. And some of my students have even put together little classes for their patients and their patients come and they learn how to use the tools in a group environment, which is fun for them.

But moving on to derma. Rolling. Derma rolling Is . A very effective tool for reeducating the connection between the skin and the muscles and the nervous system. If people have had long-term neuropathy, any sort of nerve damage. Sometimes you can, do some scalp acupuncture or work with the motor points, but this is another level of stimulating both the channels on the face so you can work right along the stomach channel, small intestine gallbladder, large intestine, any of the.

thE zong has meridians on the face. You can roll the roller to wake, not just the points up, but the entire channel. Plus, you’re stimulating the skin, which works in conjunction with the way the brain works. And these aren’t that much different than those . Barrel channel rollers that we might use on the body, but these have tiny needles and they are medical grade, so

These come in 0.5 millimeter or 1.0 millimeter in length, and they’re, you just roll them very gently on the skin. And I sell these to my patients so that they can self-treat at home once I teach them how to use it. And they all come with directions and video demos also. Okay, so Bell’s Palsy is a.

Probably the most common cause of facial paralysis that you will see in your treatment room. And it is typically a temporary condition and it is a result of a disruption of the function of the facial nerve, which is CN seven. And this prevents the messages from the brain. To the muscle, which causes muscle weakness and paralysis, and there can be a multitude of symptoms, uh, pain, neuropathy, muscle weakness.

Hearing loss taste sensations changing, um, changes in smell, vision, eyelids drooping, um, discomfort or pain in the jaw. And, uh, lots and lots of issues. And, but very much on a cosmetic level and typically. People will get this between age 15 and 60, but certainly I’ve seen patients as young as two and as old as 70, um, in my treatment space and the Western medical treatment is acyclovir.

Or an antiviral drug and then a steroid. And it is believed in western medicine that it is from a virus. And in Chinese medicine, we believe usually it is from a wind condition, wind, heat, usually, which affects the face. . the protocol for the exam is you would ask your patient to raise their eyebrows, close their eyes, tightly smile, puff out their cheeks.

If the orbicularis Aus has been affected, or the rosaro, if they try to puff out their cheeks when they close their lips, only one side will puff out and the other side arrow will come out. And smiling frowning. Show your lower teeth. Show your upper teeth. These are going to help you to isolate which muscles have been affected and then you would treat accordingly.

As I had mentioned wind, a wind condition, also blood stagnation or spleen sheet con deficiency. These are, uh, three different . Conditions from a TCM perspective that can, um, cause Bell’s Palsy. And for body treatments on everyone, I’m going to do LI four and stomach 36, and then I will treat the underlying.

dEficiency or stagnation or excess, whatever’s going on. And then I would do local. Points on the face, depending on what has been affected. aS I talked about last time, you can use scalp, acupuncture, ear chen, men, and point for the face. You can do motor points based on which muscles have been affected.

Facial cupping and Gu Shaw definitely to help bring energy into the muscles. Derma rolling . and you want to see the patient. I tell my students at least twice a week three times as ideal, but the more the better when you’re talking about treating a Bell’s Palsy patient. So this was a patient of mine and she had come in right after she was afflicted with Bell’s Palsy and I did an exam on her.

Closed her eyes. Okay. And as you can see, she could not close her right eye at all, and there is no movement in the right side of her face. And I actually misspoke. She had Bell’s Palsy for a while. She was past the point where the doctor said she would get any better and and so I treated her close for about six weeks and we were just starting to get some movement going.

Dry brow, close, dry. So you can see now she’s able to close her eye. nOt a lot of movement on the right side of her face yet the lower part, but she was able to close her lips a little bit. . It really requires patience and and time, but. iT’s just some information about my classes that I teach.

I do have an advanced certificate course, which is comprehensive. All of my classes carry CEUs. They’re all self-paced, recorded. And then you would, um, or can come for a two-day hands-on class. It’s included, but it is not required. And I do monthly live mentor sessions. That is the end of my presentation.

Here’s information about my social media. You wanna follow me on social, and I would like to say thank you to the American Acupuncture Council for this opportunity to present today. I. .

 

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance?

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

AACGELLIS11242023HD Thumb

Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance – Neuromuscular Facial Conditions Part 1

 

 

So today’s lecture topics are I’m going to define a neuromuscular facial condition. I’m going to talk a little bit about the theory behind a multifaceted approach, and then I will talk about submuscular needling and scalp acupuncture.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name’s Michelle Gillis. I am an acupuncture physician practicing in Florida, and today I am going to be speaking to you about treating neuromuscular facial conditions. This is part one of a part two presentation. First slide, please.

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance?

So this is just a little bit about me. I am a former faculty member of the Maryland University of Integrative Health, and I am currently on the doctoral faculty at Yo Sound University, and I. I have been teaching facial acupuncture classes internationally since 2005. Here are some publications that I have completed in the Journal of Chinese Medicine.

So today’s lecture topics are I’m going to define a neuromuscular facial condition. I’m going to talk a little bit about the theory behind a multifaceted approach, and then I will talk about submuscular needling and scalp acupuncture.

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

So a neuromuscular facial condition is any group of disorders which can cause weakness or pain on one or both sides of your face, you might lose the ability to make facial expressions have . Pain, difficulty eating, drinking, speaking clearly. You can have ear pain, you can lose your sense of taste, smell, it can affect your eyes, your vision.

And you can also have the inability to sense heat or cold or be very sensitive to the heat or cold. What I have discovered over many years in practice is that using a multifaceted approach to treating these conditions, because some of them can be very difficult to treat, and using a multifaceted approach, can yield a more effective treatment than just using one of these modalities or the other.

Some examples of neuromuscular facial conditions is are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, posis of the eyelids, and this can be one eyelid or both eyelids, synkinesis, which is when you’re trying to move one. Part of your face, but another part moves involuntarily. The side effects of a stroke TMJ Trigeminal Neuralgia multiple sclerosis, and there are many others I.

Part one and two of this presentation represents about an hour of what is usually a two-day class that I teach on treating neuromuscular facial conditions.

So the interesting thing about our face is that our face is the only part of our body where the skin is connected directly to the muscles, which is what gives the. Our ability to move the skin on our face without having to move any bones or ligaments or tendons. So here we have an example. We have skin, and then we have muscle.

And as you can see it, the skin is connected directly to the muscle and then down to the bone.

For example, here is a cross section of a part of the cheek, and you can see the skin and then the fat, and then the fascia and invested inside of this fascial layer is the muscle, and then there is deeper fascia and there is the facial nerve.

When treating the face, there are several things that’s, that are important and you wanna make sure you are increasing the blood flow to the area. I. Increasing the qi to the area and also if there’s any fossil adhesions that exist, that you can break these up because all of this can affect how the face moves and the sensations that we feel.

By using a technique called submuscular needling. In some instances it’s intramuscular needling, but submuscular needling can increase the flow of blood and QI to the area can help to break up any fascial adhesions. And if you are thinking in terms of . Cosmetic benefits. It can also stimulate collagen production to the area.

There are several muscles on the face, head and neck that are really conducive to this submuscular needling approach. And they are the auricular muscles, the temporalis muscle, the platysma, the masseter, the anterior digastric. The frontal, the proces, the corrugator, and the levator muscle. We are only gonna speak about a couple of those today.

And the using submuscular needling is part of this. Multifaceted approach. So in addition to Submuscular needling, we’re also going to talk today about scalp acupuncture, and then next time facial motor points, facial cupping and guha and derma rolling.

So here is another cross section of the face. And as you can see, the facial nerve is invested in this it’s called the SMA layer. It is the superficial muscular AERA system, and the nerve can become entrapped. And when that happens the signal that gets to the muscle, which in turn goes out to the skin, which moves the skin on our face, moves, the muscles in our face can become compromised.

So the first muscle I wanna talk about for Submuscular needling is the frontals and. The frontals muscle goes on either side of the eyebrows. There’s one head on one side of the eyebrow and one on the other. And what you would do is you would take, typically I do half inch needles and I would needle underneath the muscle.

And this is what it looks like here.

So when needling the frontals muscle, the way that you isolate the muscle is you ask your patient to raise their eyebrows. Go ahead and raise your eyebrows, okay? And then relax and you can find the border of the frontals muscle and the way that you needle. Is you’re going to go from the origin to the insertion.

So the origin is up here and the insertion is here.

And typically what I do is I will put in. Usually three needles

on the lateral edge, and I will put in two needles. On the medial side, and when you’re needling, what’s important is that the angle of the tube is the angle that the needle’s gonna go in. So if you go like this, it’s going to go too deep. If you go this is going to be too shallow, I use. My thumb or a finger to help to guide the needle.

So you wanna keep your fingers out of the way when you’re actually inserting. That way you can get to the correct depth right underneath the muscle. That’s the lateral side. Then you’re going to do the medial side, and usually two needles. Will suffice and I do the one side and then I do the other side and I’m using half inch needles.

You can use one inch needles depending on how big your patience forehead is.

The next muscle group. That I’m going to demonstrate for submuscular needling is the temporalis. So the frontalis is used to raise the eyebrows, and it’s also indirectly involved in raising the eyelids, the temporalis muscle, which is a large. Very thin, fan shaped muscle that’s on either side of the skull and it also goes in front of the ear.

It helps us with our chewing and it helps to, so it helps to elevate the jaw and it can be involved with conditions like TMJ. It can also cause head. Pain. If it is too tight, it can be involved in trigeminal neuralgia because nerves can become entrapped underneath the temporalis. I. And this is what this looks like.

So here’s the temporalis muscle, and what you would do is take needles and put them all around the outside of the temporalis. And I have a video for that as well.

So for the temporalis muscle. The idea is to find the outline of the muscle and it tends to be a very large muscle. It runs all the way from the back of the skull all the way around the front of the face. And you’re literally going to take the needles and you are just gonna work your way around.

The entire line of the muscle, and depending on how tolerant your patient is you can use, you can really thread like 20 of these into this area. I’m just doing a little demonstration here I want you guys to get an idea of what this looks like. And it doesn’t really matter which direction you’re going in.

What matters is that you’re getting, again, underneath the muscle and that you’re working your way all around the perimeter of the muscle in order to relax it. And they should have a nice little circle around. A muscle when you’re done, and this will really help to relax the temporalis muscle if they have TMJ.

Pretty much anything that affects the face. The temporalis muscle helps to pull the face up. I use this technique sometimes and facial rejuvenation when I teach my facial rejuvenation classes because the temporalis muscle can really lift up the face. I’m just gonna do one more again. I’m using serum one inch.

Needles. So that’s what that looks like.

So for the temper, the next. Technique that I use when I’m treating neuromuscular facial conditions is scalp acupuncture. Now, scalp acupuncture can be used and it is used traditionally to treat a multitude of. Conditions, everything from phantom pain to speech issues, to inability to move a body part.

But when I use and teach scalp acupuncture, it involves issues concerning the face. So when we when we would incorporate scalp acupuncture. We could use this in conjunction with submuscular needling or as a standalone technique, so any conditions that involve the face scalp, acupuncture can be very effective.

I. Especially when you’re dealing with a condition like trigeminal neuralgia where it’s very painful to needle directly onto someone’s face, you can use scalp acupuncture and this will treat the face without having to directly put needles in the person’s face. So here we have a cross section of the scalp.

We have the skin, we have the close connective tissue, and this is very heavily vascularized with lots of nerves. Then we have the aosis. Right below that is the loose connective tissue, and this is where you would want to insert the needle. Right below that is the perran and that is the skull. The good news is that when you’re trying to find the right depth to needle, if you just go down as deep as you can along the bone.

Then ’cause it, you, it is impossible to put an acupuncture needle through someone’s skull bone. You can needle right along the bone and if you get into the loose connective tissue, it will not be painful. If you go into the close connective tissue, you’re going through vessels and nerves, and it can be very painful.

So the thing that can be the most important thing to learn when you’re learning scalp acupuncture is how to measure. So the, you’re basically going to, these are not acupuncture points. These are areas of the. Scalp that affect different areas of the brain. And the way you measure is you’re going to get your horizontal and vertical planes, and then you will find the area of treatment based on that.

So the first landmark is from the glabella to the occipital protuberance, and the glabella is at the midpoint. Of you’re gonna get to the glabella is between the eyebrows and you’re gonna measure back to the occipital perturbance. And this will give you your line this way. And then you are going to find the midpoint, and that is the midpoint of the midline.

And if you go a half a centimeter. Behind the midpoint, that is where you’re going to be drawing a line. Right here. So you’re going to find the midpoint of the eyebrow and also go back to the occipital protuberance. And when you go back 0.5 centimeters, you’re gonna draw a line that intersects just like this, and you’re gonna break this up into three sections.

So the lower two fifths. Is this is where you would needle for concerns of the face? The upper extremities is the . Middle two fifths and then the upper one. Fifth is the lower extremities. So the lower extremities are the legs, the spine, the trunk, and the neck. And the upper extremities is just the arms and the hands.

And this bottom two fifths is the face. So this is the area that we would want to needle.

The technique for needling looks like this.

When you’re needling the scalp, it’s important to angle the needle properly so that it goes into the loose connective tissue. I like using a tube. You can freehand if you’d like, but I find that the tube helps me to guide the needle to the correct depth. I tap the needle in, remove the tube, and then I use my free hand to guide the needle

if the needle is improperly. Your patient should not feel any pain. So you’ll know that you’re into the loose connective tissue. If your patient doesn’t have any pain, when you needle, once the needle is in, you stimulate it gently for 30 seconds just like this. Or you can use electricity.

So that concludes our lecture today. So we covered Submuscular needling and we covered scalp acupuncture. Next time we are going to talk about facial motor points, facial cupping, GU Shaw, and derma rolling, and then some protocols for specific conditions. And I look forward to seeing you next time.

 

Click here for the best Acupuncture Malpractice Insurance?

Get a Quick Quote and See What You Can Save

AACGELLIS09292023HD Thumb

Microneedling for Aging Hands

 

 

Today’s lecture is about microneedling the hands, because one of the things that happens as we age, our hands can develop age spots. And the skin itself can lose its elasticity.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name’s Michelle Gellis and I am an acupuncture physician. Today I will be speaking to you about microneedling for aging hands. So just a little bit about me before we get started. I am a former faculty member and clinic supervisor at the Maryland University of Integrative Health, and I am currently on faculty at Yoan University in California.

And I’ve been teaching facial and cosmetic acupuncture classes since 2005. I have been published several times in the Journal of Chinese Medicine, acupuncture today, and also the acupuncture desk reference. So here are some pictures of me teaching. This was in Sydney and in Sydney, Australia, and in California.

So I do travel and teach internationally.

The first thing I wanna speak to you about is microneedling. I mentioned that I teach cosmetic. . And facial acupuncture classes. Neuromuscular conditions. Cosmetic conditions. So why would you want to, might, why might you want to think about adding microneedling into your. Cosmetic acupuncture practice or into your practice at all?

Microneedling is an alternative to surgery and it can address things skin level conditions such as fine lines, acne scars, loose skin, enlarged pores crow’s feet, lip wrinkles. Dark spots and even stretch marks on the body and can be very beneficial for hair restoration. And that can be head hair eyebrow hair, even empty spots if you have a beard.

So how does this work? What does it do? It helps to stimulate your body’s own collagen production and any products that you put on your skin like serum, it will help to increase the absorption of those products by up to a thousand percent. And all of this is clinically . Proven there have been hundreds and hundreds of studies on microneedling and its effectiveness for hair growth, stimulating collagen, treating scars, and increasing product absorption.

The benefits of microneedling are that there is very little downtime, unlike some other . Cosmetic procedures like lasers or surgery, there’s very little downtime. There’s very low risk. It is extremely effective and it can, as I mentioned, help to boost the natural collagen production in the body. It’s very comfortable.

Most people don’t need any numbing cream. But it, the process itself is quick, it’s comfortable, and the results can last up to five years. So here is a cross-section of skin. So this is what a piece of skin looks like, and here we have the epidermis, and then we have the dermal layer. And then below that we have the subcutaneous later layers.

So when you’re doing microneedling, you’re only affecting, all you need to affect is the epidermis. And here is a cross-section of the epidermis. And this very top layer is called the stratum corneum. And this is . The way that skin reproduces is, it starts at the bottom and then all the new good cells work their way up.

And this top layer flakes off. So microneedling when you’re microneedling, you have two different types of tips you can use on the pen. And I’ll talk about those in a minute. But one type just sloughs off the sh stratum corneum. And then the other type will go a little deeper down into the epidermis and we’ll get right into the base layer of the epidermis, which is this stratum based saw layer.

And that is where the new . Healthy skin cells get produced and by needling down through these upper layers, you will create new healthy skin cells more quickly. And this helps with wrinkles, the dark spots, and can even tighten the skin up a little bit. If your skin is . Sagging. It used to be believed that you had to go down into the dermal layer here and this can be very painful and there can be a lot of bleeding.

But what they have found in the past couple of years is you really don’t need to go that deep in order to . Affect these new fibroblasts, these new skin cells to be created. So this is what a cross-section might look like of the microneedles going down into that epidermis. And when these very sharp needles just puncture the epidermis, they go up and down very quickly and they create

They stimulate new stem cells and also fibroblasts. And this helps with things like scars and wrinkles, discoloration, and the other things that we. Mentioned, so it looks like this. You have your piece of skin, maybe this is a wrinkle or a scar, and you poke little holes into the epidermis.

You get new arterial and venous capillaries and the fibroblasts, and they all come together to form these new collagen fibers, which makes your skin look smooth and healthy and youthful. Another benefit of microneedling is it helps with the endothelial cells inside your capillaries and blood vessels, so this can help with things.

Like spider veins, it can increase the blood supply to the scalp. So this helps your scalp to be more healthy. And in addition to your products getting absorbed and exfoliating the all of the old sebum that can build up on your scalp, it helps the blood supply to the hair follicles, which helps your hair follicles to stay healthy, and it helps the little hairs to poke out.

So this is a picture of a microneedle pen, and we have a little bird joining us for today’s webinar. So I have a microneedle pen here and I’m gonna show this to you really quickly. If we can go to meet. Thank you. We can go to me. They are . Package like this, and then this end, you can plug in if you want to, or you can screw the plugin end off.

And it comes with two batteries and the batteries screw on like this, and then you would put the tip. So this is a needle tip. . And if you just, if you press, let’s see, where am I going? If you press on the end, you could see the little needles poking out. So what happens when you put the tip on the pen?

You click it on nice and tight, and then you turn the pen on

and it will. You see the numbers changing and the higher the number, the faster the little needles will go up and down. They’re moving in and out. And then you can also adjust the height right here. That’s my little adjustment. You can height you can adjust the height of the needles, and this determines how deep the needles will go in.

And the other type of tip I’m just gonna show you while you have me on full screen is called a nano needle. And as you can see, the needles are very tiny. You can hardly see them. They are like little tiny cones. And those are used for the red part of the lip. Inside the orbital rim areas that you normally would not want to needle.

Okay. We can go back to the slides. Today’s lecture is about microneedling the hands, because one of the things that happens as we age, our hands can develop age spots. And the skin itself can lose its elasticity. So when you pull on the skin on the back of the hands, it doesn’t snap back and it can look saggy.

And also the veins on the back of the hand can become very prominent. And I noticed this on myself as I was getting older. I’m 62 now and I was really becoming conscious of what the back of my hands looked like. And I used to derma roll them. But once I started microneedling and the microneedle pen that I showed you is made by AccuLift and there are a lot of great

Microneedle pens out there. So I strongly recommend we don’t have time today to talk about microneedle pens, but I strongly recommend doing your research about pens. But I started microneedling the back of my hands and it really helped with any dark spots and veins. And I was very happy that Really faded out the dark spots and helped my hands to look really youthful because most people focus on their face or their neck, but they’re not thinking so much back of their about their hands.

Now there are special concerns though when you are talking about the hands, and that is the hands are very bony. The veins can be very close to the surface. They can be very sensitive, especially when you’re microneedling on bone and because the fingers and the hands do not have as much blood circulation as other parts of the body.

especially in the elderly, the healing capacity can be reduced. So these are things you have to think about when you’re going to be microneedling the hands.

Also you, even if you’re just microneedling someone’s hands, let’s say they’re coming for cosmetic acupuncture, you do the cosmetic acupuncture on their face, and you wanna do some microneedling on the back of their hands, you want to make certain that you inquire about all of your usual contraindications, things like steroids.

Blood thinners, any prescriptions they might be on. And then after they have their . Procedure, their treatment that they use sunscreen on the back of their hands because our hands, we always think, oh, sunscreen, I’m gonna put sunscreen on my face. But we don’t always think about the back of our hands.

And then we’re driving, we’re biking, we’re golfing, we’re playing tennis, and our hands can be exposed to the sun just as often as our face. So the protocol. And again, this is just an overview. This is by no means in-depth training. If you want an in-depth training, you can go to my website facial acupuncture classes.com, and I go through a full microneedling training.

But just as an overview, the patient would wash their hands. You need to wear gloves. You can apply numbing cream if they’d like it, and that it needs to stay for about 20 minutes. Then the numbing cream comes off. You can use a cotton pad with alcohol on it or even some makeup remover with alcohol on it.

And, Definitely wipe the back of their hands with alcohol. Then you’re going to apply your treatment serum, usually a hyaluronic acid, and then you are going to adjust the pen height and needle depth according to the directions. And normally the technique with the pen is just up and down. You’re not gonna wanna go left to because you’ll be going over.

You’d be going over tendons and you don’t wanna do that. So it’s up and down when you’re on the hands. And then you might use a stamping motion if they have any spots, and you might get a little pinpoint bleeding, but that’s okay. It’s perfectly fine. You just. Go through that. And then if there’s any prominent veins, you want to go gently over those if they have any veins on the back of their hands.

So here’s an example of someone that I did. I. Just a couple of treatments on and you can see that hopefully you can see better there. This one spot in particular really faded tremendously and this had bothered her quite a bit. And little bit more collagen starting to form after just a couple of treatments.

So the treatments are spread out once a month. And normally four to six treatments is what is required. And if you want more information about microneedling training, I do live classes. And my schedule is at fa facial acupuncture classes.com. And you can also follow me on my social. It’s . You can just find me at Michelle Gillis and I have a facial acupuncture Facebook group as well.

I’m on all forms of social media under Michelle Gillis. Thank you so much and thank you to the American Acupuncture Council for hosting this. .

 

AACGELLIS07282023HD Thumb

Facial Cupping & GuaSha for Cosmetic and Neuromuscular Concerns

 

 

And I would like to thank the American Acupuncture Council for this opportunity to speak to you today about facial cupping and GuaSha for neuromuscular facial conditions.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, my name’s Michelle Gellis and I am a board certified acupuncture physician. And I would like to thank the American Acupuncture Council for this opportunity to speak to you today about facial cupping and GuaSha for neuromuscular facial conditions. Can you go to the first slide please?

So a little bit about me. I am a former faculty member and clinic supervisor at the Maryland University of Integrative Health, and I was there for almost 20 years. And I’m currently on faculty, on the doctoral faculty at Yoan University in Los Angeles, California. And I teach facial and cosmetic

Acupuncture continuing education classes and have been for almost 20 years as well. So the, I wanna start out today by giving a definition for a neuromuscular facial condition. So what a neuromuscular facial condition refers. To is any group of disorders that affects the nerves and the muscles that are responsible for moving the face, our facial expressions, and also any sort of pain or neuropathy, any sort of dysfunction or abnormality that affects the neuromuscular system.

Which involves the communication between the facial nerves and the muscles that control the face. And our face is the only place on our body where the. Muscles are directly connected to the skin and as a result, we can move the skin on our face without having to move a joint or any other part of the body.

And this brings with it some very unique . Issues such as particular conditions, which can affect either one or both sides of our face and some of the more common . Common neuromuscular facial conditions that I’ve seen in my practice over the years are Bell’s Palsy and also any sort of facial nerve paralysis.

You’ll see this frequently, people who’ve had facial surgery or an injury, myasthenia gravis, which is a degenerative condition. Involving the muscles and it is almost always noticeable on the face as well. Hemi facial spasm, which is any sort of twitching or spasming of part of the face, T M J, which involves the temporal mandibular joint.

Trigeminal neuralgia, which is a very painful neurological condition involving the trigeminal nerve and posis, which when we’re talking about the face, typically involves one or both of the eyelids. So today I’m not going to go into depth about . Different modalities for treating these diseases or about the diseases themselves.

But I am going to talk about facial cupping and gua and how and why these two modalities can be a wonderful compliment to other . Things that you might be doing, your body points, perhaps some facial motor points, submuscular needling, scalp acupuncture, things that you might be doing to help the face to get back to normal functioning.

So here is just a couple of photos from some of my classes me teaching facial gu Shaw and facial cupping. So first I’m gonna talk about facial cupping and the benefits of facial cupping. Facial cupping helps to bring blood just like . Cupping on the body helps to bring blood and cheese circulation to the muscles.

Facial cupping helps to bring blood and cheese circulation to the muscles and therefore to the skin, which means that when the extra blood circulation comes up to the skin, it . Increases the fibroblast activity, and this will stimulate collagen and elastin production. So this is more of a cosmetic benefit.

I. But having that extra collagen can be beneficial. Also, if someone has had long-term paralysis and they’ve lost collagen in their skin and their wrinkling of the skin, doing the cupping can help with that. It also relaxes any tight fascial. . Fascia fascial tissue that is on the face. And by releasing and relaxing the fascia, the face can move more smoothly and function better.

Facial cupping and gua can release nerves that have become entrapped on the face sometimes. . Wi woven within the nerve, the muscle sometimes within the fascia. Cupping helps to move stagnant lymph out of the face, which can take toxins with it and helps the. Reduce inflammation, which can help the nervous system of the face.

It also helps with inflammation on the exterior of the skin. If your patient has redness, heat signs, rosacea, eczema can help with that. And also, just like with any cupping that you would do on a patient facial cupping helps to strengthen the vascular integrity of the face.

So this is a cross section of the cheek. And you can see here we have the skin and then some subcutaneous fat. And then below that is this . S what is called the SMA layer. It is the superficial muscular aporetic system, and this mimetic muscle helps to get the signals from the nerve into the muscle, out to the skin, and it is what allows the skin on our face to move below that.

We have and it’s invested in various tissue and surrounded by fat, and then below that we have a facial nerve. Then in some areas of the face, on the fattier parts of the face, we’re gonna have more fat and then more muscle. This is a picture of a fass of fascia. If you’ve ever taken let’s say chicken and you’ve pulled it apart, that really tough fibrous stuff that you have to cut with a scissor to get the meat off of.

That is fascia and what can happen, especially if there’s paralysis. But sometimes just with aging, the fascia can become very stiff. It can get moved into a place where it really shouldn’t be. It can pull down and . Nerves can get trapped in there by doing facial cupping and facial guha. You can help to break up some of these adhesions and allow for more free movement in the face.

The cups, when you’re doing facial cupping there’s certainly a lot of options for cups out there. The ones that I like are glass cups. They’re much smaller. You could see the size. I use these two sizes depending on where I’m working on the face. But the cups are . Glass. And the reason why I like glass over silicone or any of the other materials, plastic is one of the most important things when you’re doing cupping, is that the cups can glide.

You don’t wanna leave marks on the person’s face. You don’t wanna leave cupping marks. So it’s not like cupping other places in the body where the person is gonna be left with cupping marks. The cups have gotta be able to move and they have to be able to grab enough of the tissue to make a difference.

So they have to be large enough to actually get in there and get that blood and tissue moving, but not so big that they’re too big for the face. So these are the two sizes that I like. And then the rubber part of these . Cups. It fits well in a hand and is easy to squeeze if you’re doing a lot of facial cupping during the day.

If the cup is too hard to squeeze, then it could be very difficult. Your hands can get sore and no one wants an acupuncturist with sore hands, . The Guha tools that I like are made out of Jade and they have different edges on ’em. And when I talk about Guha in a second, I’ll go over that, but there’s like a use shaped section.

There’s a little nobby section on the tops, and then the sides are flat for working on other parts of the face. , there are some contraindications with facial cupping and gua. You do wanna be cautious if your patient has very high blood pressure that’s not controlled well. It can bring a lot of blood and she and energy up to the face and the head.

If the person is on anticoagulants or just has a condition where they. Bruise easily. This could be an issue because even though you’re trying not to make any marks on the face, I. When you’re dealing with the face, the skin is thinner, the tissues are more delicate, the vessels are thinner and more delicate.

So this is something you need to note. If the patient suffers from frequent severe migraines, then facial cupping and gu. Again, brings a lot of energy up to the face and head. It can be an issue if they have a pustule acne. You don’t wanna be running the cups over that. If they’ve had any sort, I. Of treatment done on their face, microdermabrasion, lace, or Botox fillers.

This is a big conversation and I go through, in, in my classes, I go through all the contraindications and all the different types of fillers, but basically in a nutshell, for the purposes of today, if they’ve had any sort of treatment done on their face. , their skin and their face has to be healed.

And in order for you to start doing cupping and you never wanna do cupping over an area where there’s been a neurotoxin like Botox ’cause it can make it wear off or move it. The, for facial herpes, I have never personally had . A person breakout, but it’s certainly a possibility. And then if they’ve had recent dental work or any sort of facial surgery, you want to be gentle maybe some light cupping, but definitely not using guha tools over the area.

So the symbols that I use in my cupping instruction for the slides that you’ll see, I have an X that I use for suction and release, and O if you’re just suctioning and then a line if you’re dragging the cup. So in this example, when you start out, and I’m not going to go through all the steps of facial cupping, but I’m going to give a few examples.

So the first thing you do is you’re going to do a lymphatic drainage. So you would take the cup and you would suction and release down the neck. When you get to around kidney 27 under the clavicle, then you’re gonna drag the cup. Over to the lymph node, which is right around lung two, and you would do this like three times and then you would move to the next area.

I always work on one side of the face and then the other when I’m doing facial cupping. The next would be a suctioning, and then dragging the cup over different parts of the face that have been affected by the paralysis. Now, if the person is having facial pain, like trigeminal neuralgia, you would not want to be doing cupping over the areas that are tender.

In this example, , If the person had Bell’s Palsy, you would be working the cups along the stomach line to help with any facial movement in those areas. In this picture I’m showing you can suction and release and you can drag the cups around the lips, stopping at different acupuncture points and stimulating them, and this is good.

For patients who have any sort of disharmony around the mouth, whether it’s neuropathy or any sort of tension in the mouth, and this can help to release. The orbicularis oris muscle for issues with the eye, things like ptosis, any sort of drooping with the eye, or any sort of inability to open or close the eyes.

You can work gently inside the orbital rim. You don’t wanna point the cup at the eyeball, but gently working around. The orbital rim in order to bring energy into this part of the face. And the orbicularis oculi if the person can’t raise their eyebrows or if the person has a lot of tension in their eyebrow, in their forehead, if they’re having any sort of

Twitching in this area. Then you can go to yin to and suction and then drag the cup up to do 24. Do the same with you Y up to gallbladder 15 and then San Joo 23 up to stomach ache. Next is facial gu sha for facial Gu Shaw. The benefits are that by doing the gu sha on the face, it helps to clear wind, which is part of the metal element and can help with the skin metal and skin, and can also clear the wind, which

Is involved with facial ticks. Also, it helps to expel fire and invigorates the blood. Harmonizes the blood. The Jade gu sha tools are wonderful. They are very much a part of Chinese medicine. I. Only use Jade on the face for this reason. Works with stagnant blood and also helps with microcirculation and does this by causing some microtrauma, which again helps with collagen production.

So here is that tool I was talking about. This is a Jade guha tool and has different corners, this U shape and then flat sides, and then these massage corners. For specific acupuncture points, the technique that you’re going to use are very large scraping strokes, so you’re going to do it gently, evenly, and steady.

I tell my students, you go for the gu, but not the Shah. You don’t wanna bring up all that redness. They’re not going to look like they’ve had Guha, but it will . If you work in one direction other than in between the eyebrows, you can go a little more vigorously, but you are going to release some of those fascial adhesions, really get into the muscles, stimulate acupuncture points, and this is wonderful for young.

Younger patients, needle phobic patients, people who really need to be treated on their face, but are a little reluctant to have needles put in their face. So here’s an example of what it might look like if you were doing gu guha. Now, when I do facial guha, I use two tools and you’re going to put, for the cupping and guha, you’re going to put

Oil. The oil that I use that I like is all organic and vegan. It has C, B, D and Arnica in it, and it allows the tools to glide well without clogging pores. So you’re going to start at l i 20 and you can. Massage there, and then you’re going to move the tools along the sides of the face, and this will break up any sort of stagnation or disharmony that’s going on within the muscles.

And really invigorate the blood and the chi in that area. Same for the eyes. You can massage a bladder two and then use the U part of the tool around the orbital rim and around the braille. I really like, especially for wrinkles between the eyebrows, but . Even if your patient is just having a lot of tension in between their eyebrows, really getting in there with the in tongue, can I.

Relax, the corrugator muscle, the procerus muscle. It allows everything to ease up. It’s great for your patient’s mental health and my patients that have come to me with various sorts of neuromuscular facial conditions from Ms. Myasthenia gravis Bells. Even ptosis, this really can allow the face to relax and when the face is relaxed, it can function better.

I. One of the last steps that I do is I take the flat sides of the Guha tools and I work all along the temporalis muscle and the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve they can all . Have some disharmony and dysfunction if the temporalis muscle is tight or tense, if someone has T M J or if they have trigeminal neuralgia and you really can’t get in there and work on their face, you can still work on the temporalis.

Relax the temporalis and this will relax their face and their jaw. The very last step that I do is I turn my patient’s head to the side. I start at the base of the Oput and I work all the way down right to the shoulder, right down the trapezius, pressing fairly hard in one direction, and this will release the back of the neck, which releases the occipital frontals, releases the face, and it really is a very relaxing way.

To end treatment for your patients.

If you have any questions about anything that I talked about today, you can put them below and you can also go to facial acupuncture classes.com. My classes are listed there and there’s also a Contact us button, which you can use. So I want to thank the American Acupuncture Council again today, and if you missed any part of today’s recording, you can go to the link and catch us there. .