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Supporting immunity with TCM – Yair Maimon

 

 

Today I will lecture about immunity or different aspects of immunity as you know, immunity or immune system is actually a Western term. So we need to do a lot of translational medicine to understand it from the Chinese medicine perspective.

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hello everybody. This is Dr. Yair Maimon from yairmaimon.com. Uh, first of all, I would like to thank the American Acupuncture Council, put up this, uh, show in lecture. And, um, today I will lecture about immunity or different aspects of immunity as you know, immunity or immune system is actually a Western term. So we need to do a lot of translational medicine to understand it from the Chinese medicine perspective. It’s one of the most complex system in the body, and it encompasses, um, the root of many diseases we know from what immune to other. And obviously now during the pandemic, we know that the immune system plays a big part, both in, in protecting, but also a big part in the side effects of the COVID in recovery. Uh, so we’ll touch on few aspects of immunity and, um, later I’ll give kind of a small overview of the translation from Chinese medicine to Western medicine and immunity. So let’s start with some slides, please.

Okay. As the slides are coming up, um, uh, I would like to mention that it’s more, I’ll talk in this lecture about like few layers of immunity. One of them is to do with compromised immunity, like in cancer patients. And then the other one will, uh, I would like to discuss more the type of immune and immune response when the immune system is weak from both from how can we treat it from a horrible perspective and how can we treat it from acupuncture? I was very lucky to, um, do also research herbal research, uh, which proved the effect of acupuncture on immunity and especially on deep immunity or innate immunity, which is our, uh, um, the type of immunity that protects us also from viruses and protects us from, uh, all the different aspects of, uh, not acquire the immunity, which is the learning part of immunity.

So, as I say here, I’ll start with this general idea and move. And, um, also in the classics already, um, in so-and chapter 72, they mentioned if sanctuary and sanctuary is a kind of concept of all the upright chain, the body. So if Zen chief, the chief of the body remains strong shakuhachi, which is a general term for invasion of pathogens to the body cannot invade the body. Then she must be weak when invasion of Shechem take place. So already 2000 years ago, they were very aware that there is, let’s say constant war or a constant struggle between two aspects. And it’s important to understand that because when we treat, we are looking at this struggle on one hand, we want to strengthen immunity. On the other hand, if there is a pathogens we want to weaken the pathogen and there’s different ways to talk about immunity in Chinese medicine, and one of them, which I would like to start with, and I’ll try to evolve as, as we go on is to look at three different aspects of immunity Cenci and Shen is an important part of immunity Shen is our connection to self.

And let’s say even our emotional life and spiritual life. So when one is balanced, the immune system is better when one is not balanced emotionally or in the Xena life, then the immune system will go low, we’ll go low and weak. And we have a lot of examples for this, for myriad part of disease, uh, that can come up when the emotion and the spiritual part of the person are disconnected. Then we have the way cheese, white cheese, the very common way to discuss immunity in Chinese medicine. But it’s very superficial. It’s the kind of immediate fight from external threats. And then we have the gene chain, which is like the deepest part of immunity. And really immunity comes from the steepest part of gene chia or interaction all the time of our constitution and our gene with, with life. So, and, and when we go, we have look at the immunity also from a different perspective and I’m proposing different way of how we translate here.

Again, I’m taking this model that we discussed before and enlarging it. So if we look at way cheaper in Chinese medicine, we’ll look at the lung, we’ll look at the way pathogens are invading. The lung is the upper inner organ. Yeah, that is all the time connected with the external. So external pathogens will enter the lung the same as we have now with COVID. And then we can treat the, uh, external pathogens with different, um, method. By the way, also, by treating with 10 Damascus, meridians was divergent Meridian. A lot of the complications of COVID can be explained by the Virgin Meridian. Uh, and then we have [inaudible] and it’s more related to the kidney and it deals with more with internal pathogen. And then sometimes we need to resolve and look at extra meridians, and then we have [inaudible], which causes more collects to the heart and it relates to traumas.

And then we have different special points that can help the person to unlock trauma and deals better with trauma in Western medicine, we also differentiate between adaptive and innate immunity. Most of the lecture now will be on this innate immunity and also most of the, our herbal research. So we are kind of focusing on this aspect. When we look at the class practical example of a weakening of gene as a result, there is a weakened immune system, and you can see in one sentence, I’m talking Western medicine and Chinese medicine, Jenkins, Chinese medicine chemotherapy, which has given to cancer patient for example, is Western medicine. So that’s a classic example of chemotherapy will weaken immune system. And we can explain it from a Chinese point of view. So, um, you feel looking at this, the side effects, for example of chemotherapy, we’re looking at weakening of bone marrow and which causes reduce white and red blood cells.

That’s why I said medicine, Chinese medicine is weak Miro. We have general compromise the immunity and we have lots of hair and no Chili’s medicine Herod belongs to the kidney and to the gene, we have reduced in cognitive and memory functioning, more related to the gene, uh, reduced fertility, eh, aging people will age sometimes very fast when they’re exposed to chemotherapy and deep fatigue. So all this stuff I kind of explained in Chinese medicine, the weakening, this very deep substance, which is called gene. And that means also that when we applied therapy, we’ll use points or herbs to treat the, uh, this aspect of gene. I’ll give a simple example. Well, Herb’s like, uh, the best example is maybe to look at Wrenchen again, very special gene saying very special, a herb, which tonifies the gene and the UNG. So we have the normal [inaudible] that works mainly on the cheese.

We have the prepared, the red, eh, hungry tension. So it most tonifies the young, if there is more young and coldness, we have Xi and Chen, which is like the American ginseng. Um, tonifies the UN and also the superior engine St. Which is not exactly gene thing. See what ya, that actually strengthening the, not just the immune system, but also its ability to cope in stress and difficult times. So all of this herbs are very adaptogenic and this is actually the key strengths for herbal medicine in immunity. It helps to balance the immunity. If it’s overactive, it reduces it. If it’s underactive it, tonifies it. And this is the strength of, uh, looking at Chinese medicine. We hardly ever use single herbs in Chinese medicine. So we use formulas and the classic formula for immunities, you being [inaudible], um, Jane screen made of three herbs, one, she buys you think thing.

It’s amazing classical formula for general general tonifying of immunity. And obviously with the inspiration of this [inaudible] formula, we, we change it. I changed it to one formula, uh, which I’ve researched for many years in Altria, which is the result of research of just one research of almost five years when we tested this formula on different individual, both healthy and eh, cancer patients and immunities suppressed patient. So this is the LCS, eh, one or two in our research on tonics are called now. And then I did another research on the formula, which are let’s discuss here, which also affects immunity, they’ll say is 1 0 1 or protectable. So this formulas have been studied deeply. This is one of our, uh, um, published research on the effect of the botanical compounds, the LCS one-to-one and innate immunity. And I specifically mentioned the native immunity because this is the part of the immune system that both responds immediately to threads like viruses, but also has a very strong component of, uh, checking the body all the way, surveilling the body and killing cancer cells.

So this is the importance of this research. If you see, one of the conclusions was this, this research, uh, works, um, on the net immunity, but we also tested it with different types of chemotherapy and others just to see also that there is no drug in herb interaction. And that’s one of the key components of my work. And I had a very extensive, a biological lab where we can test things on different levels, not just test them on the, uh, immune system, but also see interactions with different drugs and see how different patients they’re responding to it. So this is how we ran the research. We take usually blood, uh, from, uh, patients and, uh, but also from, uh, volunteers, we isolate if you see in blue, the neutral fields from their blood. So we isolate the active, one of the active components of innate immunity.

And then in the next Quare, you can see that we are examining the neutrophil activity. So what we’re actually doing is looking at activity. When you have a normal blood tests, you just have quantity. How many you have, we are looking at how active it is after we are adding the LCS. Uh, one or two, the tonics are to the protectable, to the, uh, cells. So this is a example of, um, uh, in like four patients you can see in blue is their bladder that control Blab. And when we are adding the formula, it’s sometimes active three or four times more, both in healthy patients and in sick patients. So you can see the, how the neutrophil activity has been elevated in Chinese medicine. We also see tonifies cheese. So people are less tired, which is the classical effect of chemotherapy. So like you produce study, but I also think this formula just to sometimes when I’m fatigued I to, to tonify because it tonifies deeply, uh, the chair of the body and not a thing that we are checking, not just the neutrophil activity, but also the activity of natural killer cells.

This is the subtype of the, uh, white blood cells. And this actually are the cells that are both, uh, very active in killing viruses, but also killing cancer cells. So having a strong natural killer cell activity is something which is important to maintain health in all the levels. So here also, you see the difference between the control, uh, the component of the formula are quite interesting. There is three, um, mushrooms. It takes quite a lot of time to make the formula, to establish it, to concentrate. It, it’s always a process of testing it and testing on in, in the lab testing in different ways. And if you look at the three mushrooms put together, they also, uh, have a significant effect on immunity. In other studies, they improve the ability to cope with tress. They activate, um, and their, their active ingredient also being found and being isolated.

So on some of the mushrooms, we can really follow the active ingredient. And a lot of time is the polysaccharide like a big sugar component, which are very good in activating immunity and also balancing immunity, the other herd like a stragglers attracted. And lygus true. Also demonstrate a lot of immunomodulation function and they’re good for fatigue for mental function and stabilizing blood sugar level and even enhancing liver and kidney function. So if formula overhaul is, we know has allistic effect not much wider than just on the immunity, and this is the beauty of it. So when we are designing formula, we are looking at something that works on three different levels of immunity or Nietzsche, which is it’s actually designed Fuji that protects the Sandpoint. And [inaudible], so we’re looking at this different Herb’s and their component and how they work, not just on allowing the body to fight better with external pathogens, but also keep a better immunity inside.

And, um, I would like to know we’ll demonstrate it in a case so you can see how it is applied. A practically, as I say, I see a lot of patients in different stages and, um, this is, uh, a cancer patient. I am patient of mine. She’s 62 she’s after a lung cancer, that the main part of a treatment was removal of her left lung. She didn’t have any further treatment, just the removal of the lung, where the tumor, uh, was found. And she came immediately after the operation. So she was extremely lacking of energy. You can even see a she’s extremely vivid person. I knew her also, I used to see her in the past before she had the lung cancer. So series very active, but suddenly she was white. As we know what happened when you have achieved the efficiency. If you look in their eyes and I put the eyes, she was very depressed and detached and very sad, deeply sad.

I mean, her husband brought her in and, and really like, bang me know, do something for her. She, she really like, you know, she came before the operation. She was herself enough to shoot that. Like she lost it. You know, he feels like she’s, he’s losing her. I’ll not just on a physically, but mostly on this emotional product. So the points that I did was a combination of stomach 36 and large intestine, 10 to lead points since suddenly on the Lange and the lead point on the hand, which you combine it together as strongly tonifying the, and the chief, but again, on a deeper level, because they’re on the young meat and kidney nine, which will, tonify more the gene part of, uh, the, um, the immunity, especially working on the, on the sheet cliff points and the way my suite works deeply on terrifying immunity.

And on the back, this is one of the key points, bladder 42, the poo hall, the door of DePaul, uh, which will both work on her, Shen on the sadness. It’s quite amazing point it’s on the level of bladder, a 13.4, the lung, because it has few function. One, it treats severe immunity of the lung. It works on DePaul, the spiritual or deeper aspect of the land that is when you’re detached from it, there is deep sadness, but it also helps to reduce heat from the lungs. So it’s one of the key points to treat patients with COVID because it will achieve this dual thing that we want. In one hand, it will come this heat in the lung, which is part of the cytokine storm or excessive inflammatory reaction of immunity, but will also strengthen the land that has been weakened by the COVID.

Then by fighting the disease. And I gave her this botanical LCS one or two, the tonics are. So, by the way, if you want to read all the research, you can look away. We have just a research plant website, it’s for data formula with, for both the LCS. One, one that comes with just some pure research website and you have access to the research and also all the herds. So if you are interested, you can always read there more and, uh, to look at this, a prescription for this patient. So you can see again, I’m trying to, I have this kind of whole picture of the face. So for like, for the Shan part to do bladder 40 to DePaul who the tour of DePaul, so it will address not just the physical part, but also the shell is spirit part. This detachment is deep depression that she felt after the operation and then treating the way and the itchy by combining points on the young mean the stomach and large intestine combination and kidney nine, working on the gene.

So you’re seeing Chinese medicine. We kind of very much go from theory to practice and gave her the LCS one or two in the same times, again, to work on the way change, changing. So we are kind of having a complete, um, cover of, of immunity. And that’s the beauty of acupuncture to me that we can think in three dimension and, and treat them three dimension. And the results were amazing. I mean, a week later she was like a different person, you know, it’s like this patient tell you, wow, it’s a magic. So this is a, I think a good example of how it works. And, um, I did, there’s a lot in explaining, uh, especially during the coffin in explaining immunity. And, uh, I put it into one large teaching package it’s called to serve and protect where it has different components. So it doesn’t just look on the, uh, it looks on the foundation of immune system, like focuses also on allergies, inflammation, the way the body responds to external pathogen.

Then it goes deep into in Nathan adaptive immunity and talks about how the immune system works. And how can we it, and also talking about what we look like also deeply in this, uh, or started to look deeply in this teaching about, uh, internal causes and deeper aspects of immunity. And one of the interesting thing from a Western point of view, and it helps us to understand Chinese medicine actually goes deeper into it is when we talk about auto-immunity we talking about distinguishing self from non-self and in Chinese medicine, it has a lot of meanings. So if you will, wherever interested to look at it any further, you can look at the TCM academy website and are able to look at some of these lectures. I think they can kind of give you a wider range of appreciation of how immunity can be treated, especially with acupuncture, because it’s a vast subject.

And to me, one of the key in the clinic, so this is serving protect actually like the idea, cause immunity is a bit like, you know, it has all this aspects of having, uh, when you look in guarding, you know, society, so you have the placements, that’s how he took this name from, and then you have the, um, soldiers on the borders and you have the intelligence, et cetera, et cetera, all of them working to keep society safe and the same works in immunity. So, um, I think this kind of, uh, gives you some insight and some ideas of how we treat them to treat the immunity in Chinese medicine. So, uh, again, I would like to thank the American acupuncture council and, uh, thank you very much for watching wishing you the best of health and healing your ear. So all the very best, and you can watch also next week on the, on this channel and Matt Callison and, uh, Brian Lau talking about, uh, uh, the treatment of sports medicine. So you get another aspect of Chinese medicine and the scope of this medicine and how it treats the variety of problems. And, uh, so I hope now you’ll get more insights about immunity and then hope it was inspired and helpful. So thank you very much again for watching. Thank you.

 

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Chinese Medicine and Vision Conditions

 

 

“I believe that knowledge is power and we’re all trying to be have our patients and society become educated consumers. So as much as we can share knowledge, as much as we can share what we know with each other, the better.”

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hi, I’m Virginia Doran of luminousbeauty.com. And I want to welcome you to another edition of the point to the point. A show, very generously produced by the American Acupuncture Council today. I’m extra delighted to have as my guest, Dr. Mark Grossman. Uh, when I met Mark in 1992, we were both going to acupuncture school in, uh, New York and Connecticut. Uh, but Mark is very unusual in that he holds the licenses in both acupuncture and is a doctor of optometry and, uh, to fulfill his dream of practicing holistic and integrative eyecare, he’s fully trained in acupuncture. Uh, even though he, he didn’t need to be to, uh, to be practicing. Um, and he’s also trained in nutrition and visual vision therapy, and he saw this significant void in holistic eye care, um, and not only, you know, filled in to practice that way himself, but he trains practitioners internationally online and in-person, and, uh, he’s published many books.

Um, the four ones that, um, are probably most notable and, and, uh, appropriate for this audience is Nash, natural eye care, a comprehensive manual for practitioners of Oriental medicine, where he goes into both, um, acupuncture and herbal prescriptions. And then he has a book, natural eye care, your guide to healthy vision. They sound similar or different book. It’s an 800 page texts, and it covers about every eye condition from both the Western and Eastern perspective, plus nutrition and supplements, herbs, clinical tips. It’s really a must have for every practitioners library. He’s also written a book, very interesting book, very unusual, greater vision, a comprehensive program for physical, emotional, and spiritual clarity. Uh, another thing that he teaches about and the international bestseller magic eyes beyond 3d your vision. Um, so you can find more information about his books. Trainings has specifically done products, but also about many, many different eye conditions.

His website is full of information. He’s very generous with his knowledge as he shares it to people and that’s natural eye care.com. So after that, um, uh, I, I asked you to, to, um, you know, speak on this because I think it’s so necessary and there’s not much draining or, um, awareness of this in our field. And also, um, I think that, uh, you know, if you could give some examples of like, say glaucoma, for instance, you know, a common condition that, uh, to give an idea how you work, the in-depth, uh, approach, you have to things. So thank you so much for being out. Cause I know you were in the middle of her work day. Uh, so, you know, if you can tell us how you got into this, that’d be very briefly. And then, uh, you know, what you want to impart.

Oh, thank you so much, Virginia. And I’m very, very grateful to you, Dr. Alan Weinstein. Who’s a master of putting this out the American acupuncture council, because I believe that knowledge is power and we’re all trying to be have our patients and society become educated consumers. So as much as we can share knowledge, as much as we can share what we know with each other, the better. And it’s very interesting. I was meditating this morning and I was saying, oh, I think I know what I have to start with saying, and you said it beautifully. How did I get into this acupuncturist? Usually have a drive. It’s like, oh my God, this is my calling. This is my calling of what I want to do in life. And my story was, I was already an eye doctor for, uh, 16 years had just finished paying off my student loans.

And then I went to a friend’s house. And in the middle of her living room was one of the first books in the Western hemisphere, an acupuncture called the web that has no Weaver. And I felt that I could remember it. Like it was yesterday. The book looked at me, I looked at the book. I said, I can’t believe I got to go to acupuncture school. Now I thought I had a way out because acupuncture wasn’t licensed in New York state yet. And as you know, as one of my, uh, classmates, we had to go to school in Connecticut first. So we went to school in Connecticut for a year. And then we spent the next two to three years in new York’s New York city. So I said, well, I guess I got to go. I don’t know why I’m going. Uh, I just know I have the calling and we’re going to talk about the call and we can talk about those moments in our life that we get those signals of what we need to do and how our vision, how not only our outer vision, but our inner vision affects how we are in life and how it affects eye conditions.

And we are in an epidemic. That’s an epidemic in society right now. Do you know that over 90% of young adults from 14 years and younger in China and Japan are near-sighted, if you don’t consider 90% epidemic, then the thing is, you know, and with the advent of computers and being online. So we need to take care of our eyes. And as we know in Chinese medicine, if you can go to the first slide Allen, we know that all the meridians go to the eyes, all the meridians go through the heart. So when we are working with people with high conditions, acupuncture, Chinese medicine, I believe is an integral part of the integrative medicine team that needs to be to help these conditions. I, um, about a month or two ago, I lectured at the east west integrative medicine department that UCLA that’s been going on for over 25 years.

Oh my God. And we did an international conference, which I was part of the panel on Chinese medicine and vision. So the need is there, there were some amazing acupuncturist, like one of my colleagues and co-teachers Dr. Andy Rosenfarb who specializes in vision and Chinese medicine. So what I want to really put out today is how important and how Chinese medicine can be part of that team and myself. And I’ve been practicing for over 40 years as an optometrist. And what are we up to now, Virginia 26, 28 years, 26 years as an acupuncturist. And I didn’t even know when I was in a, I doctor school, optometry school. And I would say, excuse me, why did they get a cataract in the left eye and not the right eye? And they go, you mean, you want to know why I said, yeah, I’d like to know why.

And Ted Kaptchuk said it beautifully. He said in Western medicine, in which I was trained, we look had, how does X cause Y but in Chinese medicine, what do we look at? What is the relationship between X and X and Y? And I believe that all disease dis ease in the body mind has to do with relationships, relationships, to our environment, to the trees, to the oceans, to our, uh, families, to our friends. And what are, what is the goal of every acupuncture or Chinese medicine treatment, balance and harmony. And when we have balance and harmony and Chinese medicine speaks about it beautifully, we have no stuck energy. And I believe in my experience that almost all eye conditions, uh, due to stagnant energy. So let’s go to the next slide. Allen integrative medicine envision, we need an integrative approach. You know, I lectured at the integrative healthcare symposium and there were acupuncturists in the audience, functional medicine doctors, natural paths. Yes. I always tell people who I see, I’m just a little part of your team. We want to do integrative medicine. Next slide.

Can I interrupt a second? I went recently to an eye doctor to, you know, just have a checkup and tests. And I don’t think I’ve actually ever done that as an adult. And, um, you know, they dilated my eyes for something. They put some other drops in. I mean, for three weeks, I could barely see, and, and my eyes didn’t adjust back, you know, the dilation, but they were cloudy from the second. They put the first drops in and, um, you know, all they could suggest was a drug. And they said, oh yeah, it’s not, it’s not, it’s no problems with it. But I looked up the side effects of the drugs. It was every organ, every organ. And it was going to change. It could change the color of your skin, your eyes, but they thought, oh, no, this is totally benign. So there’s such a need for what you do, you know?

And for some and others to know about it, really, we all should be trained in this specialty because it’s, you know, what’s going on is kind of barbaric really anyway, sorry to interrupt, but you’re never interrupted. And yet at the same time, I talked to you about it and you were like, oh, we have, you know, we have technology and ways to do it, that you don’t have to be dilated. Oh, there’s different versions of these different medications without the preservatives. That cause a lot of the effects side of it, you know, why don’t other doctors know this?

So as somebody in both professions with both hats on I, doctors are really, really nice people. They really try hard. But as we know with most Western medicine, we have limited things in our toolkit. We have medication, we have surgery and that’s it. We are looking at the eye as an isolated organ. I had a patient I’m going to see later at my last patient today because he was told she has eyelid cancer, but I started talking to her. And what are the lids related to in Chinese medicine, the stomach and the spleen. Is she having problems with her microbiome? Is she having issues? Is she seeing a functional medicine doctor? Yes. But the eye doctor said, oh, you’ve got bumps on your eyelid. You know, it’s maybe it’s eye cancer, but I’m just saying, we need to look at the relationships. And remember when I just said before, um, well, why did you get a cataract in your left eye before the right Chinese medicine in most people?

Right. I father I male, I yang. I left, I feminine yen receptive. So when I really look in, I mean into why somebody develops macular degeneration, glaucoma cataracts, and why they may get an in one eye versus the others, I’m going to talk to them. What’s going on in their relationships with their father, with their husband. I mean, I’ve got stories, I’ve got stories, you know, after 40 years. So let’s keep going because this is just a preview because I really want acupuncture is to, to, to get the power that they have for this kinds of treatments. My website, natural eye care started about 20 years ago. My business partner in that is, uh, Michael Edson. And Michael is an acupuncturist also. So we refer to acupuncturist all the time because it’s both are bent. Uh, you see a pho a phone number there, (845) 255-8222.

The direct number for Michael, which is the new number on our website is 8 4 5 4 7 5 4 1 5 8. But you can go to the website and Michael loves talking to acupuncturists and we are there as a service to help you work with your patients. Next slide, Allen. These are some of my books beyond 3d magic eyes. Those of you who are old enough know about these 3d pictures that you relax your eyes and then a hidden picture comes out. Uh, it was published. We, uh, they sold over 30 million of those books. I wrote two of them. I’m the medical consultant to them. Uh, I got there, but after they sold the 30 million, so I didn’t really profit from it. Um, but those magic eye pictures, uh, one of the tools I use not only to help people’s eyesight, but to help reduce liver stagnation through the eyes, the greater vision book was written because I do believe in the Mati body, mind and spirit of all eye conditions, natural eye care that I wrote with about twenty-five years ago, which was the book before it’s time with a good friend of mine, Dr. Glenn sweat out is in Hawaii. Um, and then we can go to the next slide where we expanded on it to that 800 page, 2000 peer review references book, uh, on natural eyecare. And that book is also available on Amazon and then on Kendall. And we also divided it into about five or six smaller books because that’s a very heavy book, but it is, it is. I have had the 10 different doctors help me with it. So it is, uh, a really good resource. Um, next down, next slide.

So let’s talk just a little bit. The only thing worse than being blind is to have sight, but no vision. Where does vision happen? It happens in the mind. That was a quote from Helen Keller. Next slide, Dalai Lama, in order to carry a positive action, we must develop here a positive vision. One of the real keys in Chinese medicine is the person has to have it in their belief system that the, this kind of thing can help. You know, we’re not there to convince people. We want people to feel positive and if they can conceive, if they believe it, they can conceive it. Next slide. This is, uh, something which my magic eye books are based on vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others. You know, we need to see the bigger picture and what does Chinese medicine do? It sees the bigger picture next, and this is how I sign all my emails.

And I’m going to give you all my personal email, um, today, because you’ll see if you have any questions that come up, because the question is not what you look at, but what you really really see next slide. Okay. And here we go. No, no, that’s good. We got to go to Shakespeare. The eyes are the windows to your soul. We know about that. People, the Shen the spirit, the pilot light our eyes tell us how much our spirit is connected with our soul. And I believe that through the eyes we can help people, uh, go through their soul’s journey next and Benjamin Franklin, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. So nutritionally Chinese medicine wise, if we can get people on good visual hygiene, the dentists talk about dental hygiene, plus your teeth, brush your teeth, brush your teeth, but we’re on computers. Yeah, because 11 hours a day on digital devices, we need to do visual hygiene. We need to take care of our bodies and our mind next.

And this is the integrative medicine approach, which is, I think the Chinese medicine approach imagine a oriented towards healing rather than disease, where physicians believe in the natural killing capacity of human beings and emphasize prevention above treatment in such a world, doctors and patients would be partners towards the same ends. And that’s why the minimum I’ll see patients or clients is I say, I want you to come in after we’ve worked for awhile, once a season, as the seasons change, as you are going to be relating to your environment different than, uh, we need to do a tune-up. So on all my clients, I say the minimum I’m going to see you is once we get everything balanced and in harmony is once a season. Next slide. So these are some of the allied complementary practitioners I might refer to for different eye conditions. Um, and acupuncturist is right there.

And even though it’s, it’s not on top, let me tell you, uh, my partners in my practice, my PA one partner is a chiropractor and the other partners, and as an acupuncturist. So, uh, acupuncture and chiropractic are some of the biggest referrals that I make in my, um, uh, integrative team approach, along with natural paths and functional medicine practitioners. But at different times, I may use any of these different complimentary practitioners. Next, this is the office I rent space in. This is the outside next slide. The reason I’m showing this is the waiting room before COVID where now we have people six feet apart. Next next one, contact lenses next, because contact lenses from an acupuncture standpoint, what they do is they put people who are very near-sighted. They create a larger retinal image size. So actually just switching people from an eye as an eye doctor from glasses to contact lenses may open up a whole way of Le less liver tree stagnation.

These are some of the, this is some of the high end technology that’s available today because, and I can help you as acupuncturists, uh, read the reports on this and, uh, talk to you about the findings on some of these tests, in terms of Chinese medicine. These are pictures underneath the retina. They take pictures underneath the macula, underneath the optic nerve. They take a 3d picture of the eye. And as, um, Virginia said some many times we don’t have to even dilate the eyes. Do you know, as we said, the eye Embrya logically physiologically and neurologically, what is it? It’s brain tissue. If you continue to mind, you can change your eyes. We all know about the neuroplasticity of the brain. Therefore we have neuroplasticity of the eye and you know, that you can diagnose, uh, Alzheimer’s disease early through retinal photos. Yes. This thing is out there. So the technology today in the eye will give good insight to people’s eyesight. Next slide. Okay, let’s go to slide 23. [inaudible].

So, as I said, the hi is brain tissue. Do you know that there are studies that in multiple personality disorders, they all had different prescriptions. Oh, very interesting. Mind, body spirit, next slide and trigger points. Uh, both me and Virginia. We had the pleasure and the utter gratitude that we were able to learn from. Uh, one of the, the pioneer of trigger points, Janet Trevell who wrote these two giant giant books, even bigger than my book on trigger points. And when I learned that it’s the neck, the shoulder, the upper trapezius, going to the sternocleidomastoid up to the suboccipitals that many vision problems come from, because why not that that happened? Because people have poor posture when they’re on devices and things tension. Exactly. Next slide Allen, the spleen is surveys is the neck muscle. So when we’re doing trigger point therapy, we can help with pain in the eyes.

We can help with glaucoma, which, um, I’ll talk about very briefly after, but I really wanted you to know that trigger points, uh, whether you do it through deep tissue or you do it through acupuncture could be very, very helpful in, uh, treating, uh, eye problems. Next slide again, the SCM, a biggie player, especially with musicians, especially like violin and Viola players. Ah, because those people I’ve got studies on how that affects a stigmatism. So yeah, the eye and the body and posture are very related. Next slide. The psoas muscle. If you have a tight psoas muscle, sometimes it relates to a vertical imbalance between the two eyes. So again, we have to look at the whole body next.

Okay. That’s it for the slides on. Thank you. So I’ve got about six minutes. I’m going to give you an overview of glaucoma because glaucoma is so we can do so many things because glaucoma is a disease, this ease of the optic nerve. But the only thing that I doctors having a toolkit of glaucoma is medication with lots of side effects and surgery, and they even have people. And then what they say is, oh, oh, we just have to lower the pressure. But look at that. Here’s the, here’s the optic nerve. Yes. According to physics, if you lower the pressure in the eye pressure hitting the optic nerve, that’ll be helpful because the higher the pressure, the more it could possibly break down the optic nerve, normal pressure and glucometers between 10 and 22. But wouldn’t it make sense to also build up the ocular blood flow to the optic nerve?

Wouldn’t it make sense to work on neurodegenerative neuro uh, uh, neurodegeneration? I mean, that’s what, uh, the eye research is showing. We want to have, um, things that are helpful for the nerves. So nutrition very helpful for that alpha-lipoic acid N-acetylcysteine, um, sublingual, vitamin B12, the B vitamins. So nutrition, very helpful acupuncture super-duper for, uh, helping with ocular blood flow and circulation because circulation, that’s why studies show that as little as aerobic exercise, four times a week can help with, uh, lowering the pressure. But what is one of the, some of the main things in Chinese medicine? You know, we all say liver, liver, liver, nice, but in Chinese medicine and glaucoma liver is a big player because it’s the stagnant liver cheat that can add to, to, uh, CA um, Livia, hyperactive, liver, young, that can cause a high eye pressure. So I’m always trying to bring the pressure down, bring it down.

I want to deal things with the earth element. I may have them stand in dirt, rub a, a ball on kidney. One, bring the energy down. So liver three, liver aids for blood, uh, gallbladder 20 to release the tension in the occipital. Uh suboccipitals so liver kidney very, very important. Especially sometimes the pattern is a kidney yin and Liberty in deficiency. So there’s basically, this is where it gets a little tricky. There’s like six different kinds of glaucoma. Some glaucoma is due to more due to inflammation, such as pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. Some glaucoma has normal tension, normal eye pressure, but has what we call large cupping in the optic nerve. And therefore, you know, we can lower the pressure, but it’s more about getting more blood flow to the optic nerve and, uh, helping the nerves. And then there’s the eye, the glaucoma that has high eye pressure.

But again, the tool dry doctors is just lower the pressure. So we can see very easily how Chinese medicine can have an effect. And going back to the muddy bind spirit stress, oh my God, they have studies that show that stress can increase the eye pressure. So even in the regular literature on Western medicine, so we want to relax. That’s why my favorite formula that I created with my, uh, acupuncture partner, Jason Elias, and we called revision. And what is it based on B Florim and Pini combination. Why, because what is that called relaxed wander? And I added some bilberry and some Ginko, and I added a little Licey and chrysanthemum to bring energy to the eyes. So we really want to do Western Chinese herbs coleus and air vinegar. That’s very good to lower eye pressure. So I really, what I really want to share with you and hope you get a, and if you want to learn more, I am totally available.

My personal email is D R Grossman 20 twenty@gmail.com. I really want to let you know that the ability for Chinese medicine to help with chronic eye conditions and basically all eye conditions, is there that Nick, that place that you, if you really into it, that you want to add to your practice is there. And you will, you will have patients. My friend and colleague, Andy Rosenfarb is busy, busy, busy, and he trains, uh, acupuncturists in a special kind of acupuncture called micro acupuncture. So again, thank you so much for your attention and your time. And hopefully listening to this, uh, again, knowledge is power, and I hope that you become part of an integrative medicine team to help people in the world keep their precious gift of sight. Thank you so much.

Thank you so much, mark. And thanks again to the American acupuncture council, um, Virginia Doran signing off from luminousbeauty.com and yeah, Yair Maimon is next week. So, so he’s always got something interesting. I hope you’ll check that out too. All right. Goodbye. Bye.

 

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The Yin and Yang Balance of Sleep Tsao-Lin Moy

 

 

Today I’m going to be talking about the importance of sleep and using it as a way of improving health for your patients.  People are not getting enough sleep, and this was an issue that was happening even before the pandemic.

Click here to download the transcript.

Click here to download the slides.

Hello and welcome. My name is Tsao-Lin Moy, and I am an alternative medicine acupuncturist and Chinese medicine practitioner. And I want to thank the American Acupuncture Council for hosting these Facebook live events. Um, today I’m going to be talking about the importance of sleep and using it as a way of improving health for your patients. Uh, so, uh, let’s go to the slide.

Okay.

So one of the, uh, problems that we are facing in these times is that, uh, people are not getting enough sleep, and this was an issue that was happening even before the pandemic, um, that, uh, we have a situation that is really a crisis, um, about a hundred million Americans, which is one-third of the population are sleep deprived. And that means getting less than six hours of sleep per night. And poor sleep has been linked to many chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity, dementia, and chronic pain. And the studies actually show that if you miss one night of sleep, I means like, stay up, do an all-nighter that you, um, you build up a protein called beta amyloid at two, as much as 5%. And this is, uh, a linked to impaired brain function. And it’s also associated with Alzheimer’s disease. And this is where these beta, the beta amyloid proteins actually clump together and create those plaques.

So lack of sleep, it’s also linked to increased emotional disorders, including things like anger. And later on, I’m going to actually talk a little bit about it, like how it works with the season, right? So seasonal, emotional issues can be linked back to sleep. Uh, what we know is poor sleep has been a problem for weight gain, uh, hormone imbalances in fertility for male and female lowered immune function because of the, the cytokines, which are the inflammatory process and also premature aging. So, uh, many of you, if you have children or have been home and may have been experiencing this, uh, uh, problems, getting sleep, uh, being stuck at home, right? Uh, so what I am going to talk about is, uh, as you, as practitioners, understand the yin and yang, and really what I’m going to do is relate it to sleep because the, of yin and yang play a major role in sleep.

Restorative sleep is governed by the body’s circadian rhythm and the sleep and wake homeostasis. So circadian rhythm is that internal biological clock that regulates wakefulness, metabolism, body temperature, and hormones, and synchronizes with environmental factors, such as temperature and light. And this is also true of the seasons. Uh, what’s interesting is that it also closely relates to the Chinese medicine organ clock. So here’s a picture of the Oregon clock, right? We all, this is a foundations in Chinese medicine. And as you know, if you are a practitioner of, uh, Dr. Tang, that you might also, you look at the clock is how you’re going to treat the different meridians systems, right. Um, okay. So yin, if we look at yin is considered the hormone of darkness or the hormone of darkness we should say would be yet. Um, this is the circadian in the part of the biological clock that signals the release of melatonin.

So melatonin is called the hormone of darkness because it gets triggered when the light is lowered. And so when the sun begins to set, we have melatonin that starts to build up and it signals the body to start to move into a yin phase, which helps you to, to slowly go into a sleep phase. So following these movements and rhythm of the day and nighttime in the evening, the body is going to naturally move towards a yin phase. And that parasympathetic, which is the rest and digest, this is what Phyllis, uh, facilitates, you know, restorative and restful sleep. And so studies show that actually people that work night hours that combat that natural rest period, uh, in terms of light, um, they cause a misalignment of their circadian rhythm. And what happens is they suffer more cognitive problems and they’re at higher risk also for developing diabetes.

Uh, so somebody who drives a truck or is, uh, just, you know, staying has like the night shift clearly related to, um, higher health problems. Um, so it’s important also what time you go to sleep versus not just the, not only the quality, but you look at the time because there is an, and there’s also like how much the quantity we really need at least seven to eight hours of sleep. Now, the thing is, is what we need is really restful sleep. So here’s a little bit of the, the nighttime, uh, the, the yin time. And we see the moon so related in time is related to

Pink. Yup.

We’re looking at is more sunshine and vitamin D. And so in the morning when the sun rises, we actually are entering into that young phase and become wakeful. And this also relates to the circadian rhythm. Sunlight will actually pause that melatonin production, and it’ll also help the body to produce vitamin D. And that also helps with mood and other metabolic functions. So if we don’t get the restful sleep, it will manifest in being tired and wired. And that could also be related that you’re not getting enough sunlight. Right. Um, so, and just as a side note, every cell in our body has vitamin D receptors. And if we look at many of the people that had a severe COVID from had lowered levels of vitamin D, uh, in the U S we have a lot of lowered levels of vitamin D even before, uh, since we spend a lot of time indoors in front of our computers, uh, watching zooms, uh, this is, you know, exhausted. We don’t, we just don’t get out. And we also see with children, they don’t run around and play so much anymore. They are really stuck in doors doing activities. Uh, so what’s really important is for children to actually get out there into the sun and, and play, and also as adults too, we really need to get outside and move around. Okay. So here we go. This is exactly, yeah. Fantastic. Would it feels like to be a kid running around in the sunlight, uh, enjoying, enjoying themselves.

So what causes this imbalance or to this a yin and yang out of balance? Well, as I said, you spoke about it a little earlier. The problem of modern life is that we also tend to ignore and override the body’s inclination for rest. And this can result in like racing thoughts when it’s time to sleep. And I’m sure a lot of your patients report, they can’t get to sleep. They, you know, they keep thinking about what they need to do. So this is really an example of this young energy when it’s really time for the yin to quiet down, or we see people staying up all night long and then sleeping during the day. And that’s really when they are out of alignment, really out of alignment with the Nat, the natural cycle. And what happens is, is that when you do that, your body is, is actually fighting with the, the rotation of the earth, right.

Going and moving towards sunlight. And you’re going down trying to go down and all of the forces of nature are pulling you back up. So what happens is you get very tired and wired. Um, and so really studies they’ve shown that people that work night shifts also have greater health issues. Um, even if they’re getting the hours of sleep, that they need the number of hours so that they there’s more, that has to be looked into. Uh, another thing is also people say like, Oh, I catch up on my sleep on the weekend and you cannot catch up on your sleep. It doesn’t so not getting enough sleep. You create something called a sleep debt, right. And that negatively impacts the, the, the health. So things such as stress, fear, and anxiety, which are like being in that fight or flight mode very young, um, that is often one of the complaints that people have, especially when it’s time to rest.

Uh, so just sitting and relaxing, their mind is still going, which means there’s this disconnection of the mind and body. So not going into calm, being relaxed and stable, which is more of that yin time. So there’s not enough time for recovery. So what we see is is that there may be too much of activity. And then the body just doesn’t get that TA like the focus time to relax. So then we start to have this thing where it, uh, the adrenals get involved and the people are unable to actually rest and relax. They just can’t go into it. And that’s like kicks into their nervous system, right? So when we’re looking at this, we’re looking at the illness is coming, comes from being out of balance with nature, our environment, and how it affects our biology. And so this yin and young balance is reflected.

It shows up in the quality and the quantity of our stuff sleep. Um, so, you know, why are we talking about this? Well, this is addressing sleep as a strategy for your patients. So no matter what they’re coming in with focusing on the quality of their sleep is going to be really, really a good key to helping them to heal. It’s also telling you that something else is going on, right? So most people don’t consider sleep as a wellness or self care practice. They don’t think of it as an activity because they think like, well, I’m just lying there. I’m not doing anything. But the fact is, is that there’s a lot that’s happening when you’re sleeping and you really need to get that quality sleep just as you’re preparing for your day. You know, this is an activity that, you know, during the daytime, very young, you’re very aware of the activities that you’re doing when you’re sleeping.

You don’t need to be aware of those things in your sleep. You need to come that part of your brain down and let that your body take over. So most patients, when they come in with the chief complaint, we know that there’s an imbalance in Ian and young. We can look at the meridians, we can look at digestion, we look at the emotions, right? And then the key is like, well, what can we look at that is really gonna give us, uh, an indication, because it’s really not yin or yang, it’s yin and yang. So that problem that they’re coming in with, there’s gotta be the other side of it. And so this is where we can look at sleep. So if somebody is not getting restful and restorative sleep, their body, you know, their, their body needs to heal if they are getting the sleep.

So even if they report that they get great sleep, um, that there’s a pro you know, sleep is going to be something that’s involved in, cannot be perfect balance if young is out of balance because they’re interconnected. So if someone has a problem, then we know that there’s also going to be the other side in, in the yin aspect. Um, so, and the other, again, I said, you can’t catch up on your sleep, right? We have the sleep debt, and that’s like an, I, those are one of those myths that people are like, Oh yeah, I sleep on the weekend. It’s not. And in fact, if you sleep too much, that you also can cause a problem like the, the, uh, the metabolic waste builds up and toxicity. So sleep quality we’re looking at. So what happens when you have a good night’s sleep, you release growth, hormone growth hormone is what helps maintain healthy body tissue.

It promotes healthy metabolism and is important for maintaining bones. 75% of growth hormone is released during sleep. And it helps to restore your body and muscles from stress experience during the day. So this is really key. If you don’t get into that restful state, this is not happening. And so that is going to be a real clue. If your patients are not healing, right, better mood and positive outlook, sleeping well means you’re regulating the autonomic nervous system to be in a state of rest and digest your body. And mind are able to repair and recover and balance brain chemicals. Poor sleep is correlated with depression, deep restorative sleep results in a more positive outlook on life. So anybody who has depression, you’re going to notice that they probably sleep a lot, but it’s not restful. So that’s where you there. That’s one of the clues of, yeah, well, I get a lot of sleep, but it’s not restful.

And so that means that there’s some other imbalance that’s going on. So immune function studies show that sleep quality and immune function are linked to better health outcomes. So getting deep and restful sleep, you are able to reset and remove that metabolic waste that builds up from stress and in turn reduces systemic formation. So we also know that children require a lot of sleep. Why is that? Whatever they’re learning, they’re growing and learning and their body and their brain needs to be able to integrate and do its functions, right? So this is true for us, even as adults. And, and when people are not healing, we can look at that. They’re probably not getting restful sleep. So you’re, we’re looking at the four seasons, right? The spring, summer, fall, and winter now seasons and patterns of sleep right now, we’re in the spring time. So all in all things, we can see that there’s a dynamic interplay of nature and seasons that are a microcosm of the cycle of life.

So we are influenced, this is, it goes back to the circadian rhythm, right? That we are also, uh, relates, you know, our health is also related to the environment. Uh, so if you look in certain countries where they have like four hours of light, when they’re in the winter, or they have, you know, forever a day, they tend to have a lot more emotional, um, problems. Right. Um, so understanding that the yin and yang of our body is what connects our biology for the need of sleep daytime and nighttime. So that we’re in sync with the movement of the sun and the moon, as well as the seasons where the amount of light will change. So being in rhythm with nature is going to help us with the flow of our own internal clock. So that’s resetting the circadian rhythm and the body’s ability to maintain homeostasis.

So this also applies in the change of seasons because we start to look at people having more health issues at certain seasons. So important to bear in mind that people’s energy will shift depending on those seasons and can show up in pulses and different types of illness. Right? So we always expect in the spring time that you’re going to have a little bit of a winery pulse, and that’s going to be normal in the spring time. Right. Cause your with the seasons, um, we got a little winter, okay. Winter, for example, is considered the most UN time of the year for looking at union young. Um, it’s cooler, there’s less light. Uh, it naturally influences the process of slowing down animals naturally go into hibernation to conserve their energy. And that’s true of us. We tend to feel more sleepy. We gain a little more weight, may not have so much energy.

You want to go and, and, and, you know, sleep. Uh, and so it’s during this sleep that the body temperature actually lowers. So this is something that we, you know, going into a sleep phase, we actually, our body temperature lowers. So we go towards the end, which is why, you know, the first days that are cooler after hot summer people have fantastic sleep. So people are also, uh, sensitive to the seasonal change, right? Experiencing the winter blues, the seasonal, sad, um, their relationship of their internal balance becomes upset by the external changes of the season. And in this case, something like sad in the winter, they may sleep excessively, withdraw, feel like hibernating and experienced depression. Also people with low vitamin D have a higher chance of developing seasonal depression. Uh, so treatments such as light therapy, acupuncture, exercise, and vitamin D have been found to help.

Now, if you’ve been indoors all summer, as winter comes around, what happens is, is that you have lowered vitamin D and you can become more, you know, have, uh, feelings of melancholy and depression, right? And so here is we’re looking at the young time. This is summer, right? So this is the most young time of the year. And so the warmth of the sunlight makes people feel a lot happier, right? We have more energy because we’re getting the energy and here there is a propensity to stay out later. So this is one of the things and get less sleep. Uh, the additional time in the sun is where people also get vitamin D and some of it can be stored in the body, right? That’s what kids do. They run around outside, and, uh, get a lot of sunlight in, in certain cultures where they’re working in the fields, they’re out there getting vitamin D and, uh, they don’t have to take the supplements, right?

Historically we didn’t have supplements, uh, in the summer, but we need them. Now, when you do need them now, uh, for many other reasons, environmental factors that cause us to lose, uh, also, um, important, uh, vitamins and minerals, uh, in summer months, some people experience more anxiety though, and agitation and even mania, right? So that’s that heart energy not sleeping, right. If they’re out all the time, they can actually trip into, uh, having more mania. So summer insomnia, they call it where, uh, that can be very frustrating. And that we see in, uh, in climates where people have like forever song, uh, long days of sunlight, you know, closer to the North. So maintaining a sleep schedule and cooling the environment and, uh, darkness for sleeping is something that can help. So this is where someone has to get really disciplined in the summertime, right?

Because that is actually kicking in their natural propensity for being very up, right? So they need things to do to help, to balance it out. So this is like seasonal illnesses and getting sleep, uh, getting good sleep in the spring is especially helpful for the emotion of anger, right. Uh, we’ve been seeing a lot of outbursts and a lot of stuff going on, at least here in New York city, where I am, you see people, you know, very angry and agitated. Uh, and of course the, the formula of choice is the shallow song to kind of help, uh, to unwind the liver and smooth out the emotions. So this is like that liver young energy people get very agitated as also as the season shifts. So it was at, to look at when there is a shift in season that we’re going to have liver energy is going to be involved to a certain degree.

So not getting sleep is also going to mean the blood’s not stored during the night and results in irritability and angry outbursts, also allergies and itchy skin fall, poor sleep. You can have more worry and anxiety, digestive problems, gas, and bloating, and then you get colds and sinuses and more melancholy, you can get lack of sleep is going to magnify any of these seasonal influences. And also it’s going to magnify the imbalances that are part of that patient’s constitution. So this is a place where when you look at their constitution and look at what’s going on in the season and how it’s relating to their sleep, like what’s happening. And that’s like a, like a, I won’t say a no brainer, but it’s a good start because what happens is people’s symptoms are all over the place and you start to chase them. And so you’re going to know if they’re having emotional problems, that there’s going to be some liver involvement, and you’ve got to look at whatever liver energy involvement and look at whatever else is going on with the season and their sleep, right.

So really to help your patients to cultivate better health. Um, if you’re, you know, diet is going to make a difference, right. With sleep, um, exercise, making sure to move the cheese in blood. And definitely during the, you know, outside, uh, meditation for mindfulness acupuncture is going to definitely help, right. With regulating the nervous system. Um, we’re looking at herbs supplements. They may need support with, like I mentioned, you know, shallow sawn in the, in the spring. Uh, but if you’re a new Yorker that is like, uh, you know, that’s the, the first formula you might think of. Cause new Yorkers tend to get very irritable and cranky and agitated, um, get some bodywork, cause touch is also going to help, right? Uh, again, there’s something when I, I love is the environment with Feng Shui, I’m going to quickly do something with that and spending some time in nature so that you’re able to really take advantage of, you know, the, the earth.

So here are some tips for better sleep, for something that you can do with your patients, mind, body harmony. So worrying and overthinking those racing thoughts are very young and it makes it very difficult to fall asleep and have a restful sleep. So powering down the mind is just as important as lying in bed, a relaxation, meditation, and breathing exercise can help bring the body back into a parasympathetic or you’re a yin phase. Now most, if somebody is very agitated, it’s very hard for them to meditate, right? I’m sure you have patients that say, I can’t do it. Oh my God. My mind races. Um, so what there is instead is there’s that four, seven, eight relaxing breath. Um, and it’s an exercise it’s really simple to do. Um, uh, there’s a link to it in here. And later on, if anybody wants the slides, uh, they can have the slides, right? It’s a, it’s a method of helping to calm you down. You can use it anywhere. You know, it helps with anxiety and actually helped to shift the nervous system. Breathing is also going to help with oxygenating the body and moving the energy, right. With each breath, we know that the cheese is going to move like five soon, right? And, and if we’re, our energy is stuck, we need to be

Great

In time promoting deeper sleep. So in time getting to bed before 10, right? The, the, the Oregon clock, right. We want to make sure we’re in bed before 10. So sleep can occur during the most yin time between 11 and 1:00 AM. So that’s taking advantage of the circadian rhythm and the movement of the earth. So when you’re in rhythm with your own biological clock, as well as with the plan, and then we’re looking hormone of darkness, you some heavy curtains on the windows, block out the light and the noise to help keep your biological clock for you to have a produce the melatonin and the rest will sleep. Right. So this is the thing in studies. If you’re, you’re looking at your, your computer or your TV or your smartphone, they found the people that, uh, expose themselves to room light before bedtime actually suppressed the synthesis of their melatonin. Right? So it means you got to put your phone down probably a couple hours before, at least, um, in temperature, you know, studies also show that the best temperature for sleep is 65 to 70 degrees. So your body will naturally lower its temperature and stay cool while staying asleep. So your body actually does do that.

Good.

So, um, young and moving energy, get outside and do a little bit of exercise. Um, this helps the body to synchronize, uh, with the movements of the earth. Uh, we see that, you know, looking at nature, um, here doing a little exercise in the early morning to move the Chi and gather that energy from the sun, uh, and then tips for functions way, you know, removing clutter, uh, distract, like that creates a mental distraction and chaos, um, that can actually interfere.

I got nice thing.

And then here, you know, preparing the sleep environment, you want to lower the lights again, you know, for the melatonin, no TV screens or computers, make sure you have those heavy curtains really make it a ritual for sleeping. Right. And, uh, again, uh, so this is, uh, I’m gonna stop sharing my screen here. Uh, if you, again, if you need copies, uh, you can, or you missed part of this, uh, this is going to be, uh, available to you. Uh, you can, I guess you can email or text, uh, you can get copies of the recording, uh, and, uh, yeah, for a copy of the transcript, you’re going to need to, you can text needle, uh, to the, the number (714) 332-6926. And, uh, I hope this was, uh, informative for you and please join us next week. Uh, when we’re going to have Jeffrey Grossman, who’s going to be hosting, uh, these, this, um, uh, American acupuncture council, uh, Facebook live. And, uh, so I want to thank you all for listening, and please comment. If you have any questions, you can always get in touch with me. And, uh, again, uh, this, uh, you can, uh, get the transcript and I think there’s going to be a replay too. Thank you.

 

AACTTPCallison-Lay03032021

Introduction to the San Jiao Channel Sinew (Jingjin)

 

 

So we are going to discuss a St Joe’s sinew channel today, a little bit of the typography, a little bit more of the anatomies to start off with, and then we’ll, um, have a chance to talk about a representative injury of the channel. So that’ll give you a little preview of what’s to come in the next 20 minutes or so,

Click here to download the transcript.

Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the American Acupuncture Council podcast. My name is Matt Callison. Hi, I’m Brian Lau. We’re from Accu sport education and the sports medicine acupuncture certification program. Uh, we want to chat with you today about the San Jiao channel. So can we get into that first slide please? Alright, so go ahead, Brian. Yeah.

So we are going to discuss a St Joe’s sinew channel today, a little bit of the typography, a little bit more of the anatomies to start off with, and then we’ll, um, have a chance to talk about a representative injury of the channel. So that’ll give you a little preview of what’s to come in the next 20 minutes or so,

Matt, were you going to say something? I was just going to introduce that you did a great job.

All right. So this’ll actually also give a flavor of what we teach in the sports medicine, acupuncture certification, each module, we haven’t anatomy, palpation cadaver lab. Uh, so there’ll be some elements of the anatomy that we’re going to be teaching and actually have a class you’re watching this live there. We’re going to be starting tomorrow, uh, for the upper extremity. So the San Jo channel will be one of the many channels that we’re looking at, obviously for the upper extremities. Um, and, uh, some opportunity to look at some, uh, dissection that we’ve done, that we’ll be presenting in our class. Uh, so we’ll remind about this, but if you are watching this around other people, we’ll give you a heads up before the dissection stuff comes on and give a couple thoughts on that, but you just want to make sure that there’s nobody, uh, around you that might be, um, you know, it might be disturbing for some people, if they’re not medical providers and they’re not used to seeing cadaver images. So we’ll give ample warning before those videos come on.

All right. So let’s go to the next slide and we’ll start looking at some of the entry, uh, anatomy for the channel sinew of the Sanjay channel. So this is from a translation of Vietnamese scholar Vanji, uh, from, from the link Shu chapter 13. And if you kind of glance through it, uh, you can see that it gives a description of the typography. It’s kind of vague, you know, the, uh, very open to interpretation and, and vague some of the anatomy descriptions and the link shoe from chapter 13 for the channel send news channel, send sinews have maybe been a little bit less, um, explored than the primary channels and some of the other secondary channels, like low connecting, et cetera. So the channel send you is probably in the history of Chinese medicine. Haven’t been explored as thoroughly, and we’ve been doing a lot of work within the sports medicine acupuncture program to, um, further define and be a little bit more specific on the anatomy of each channel, uh, including which structures are involved with, with channels, how they link with other channels in terms, um, parents, you know, like internal, external related channels, how they communicate and work with those, how they work mid David died, et cetera.

So just to be a little bit more, um, specific with the anatomy and a little bit more specific with some of the functional anatomy in particular, so you can kind of glance through and see some, some aspects of the original description at least translate in English and this translation. So anything dad, Matt? Yeah,

This is good. Let’s go into the next slide there.

Yeah. So yeah, here we have, uh, our interpretation of the, um, San Jo send you channels. Sometimes we referred to them as sinew channels, channel sinews, DJing, Jenn musculotendinous channel, a lot of different translations DJing. Jen would be the, um, the opinion version from the Chinese. So here’s our interpretation of that. The sand shout send new channels a little bit, um, harder to interpret as it gets higher up into the traps and starts, uh, including some of the, um, the cervical fascia. And we’ll go over that when we get to it. But if you just glance through the list, that’s pretty channel like we have the fingers, finger extensors on the back of the, uh, kind of posterior surface of the forearm. Uh, deep to that, uh, included is the super Nader. Uh, then the medial head of the triceps, the triceps are three muscles, but there’s two that are superficial belong had in the lateral head are more superficial.

And then deep to that is a shorter tricep muscle, which is in a different sort of compartment. I’m still a tricep, but it’s a deeper one and that’s the medial head. And that’s part of the San Josten new channel, the more superficial as part of the small intestines, any channel then as that travels up and connects with the lateral intermuscular septum that goes into the deltoids into the superficial deep cervical fascia, superficial layer, upper trapezius, SCM dye, gastric, and up into the scalp. We’ll go through that in a little bit more detail in the next several slides and that you were going to add something to this also.

Yeah, I think it’s important for us to remember that each one of these muscles in these tissues are all interconnected. So this is why when we can treat something, put an acupuncture in distal, how it can signal along that model of fascial chain and soften or change pain at a proximal area. For example, if somebody has pain in the SCM, how we can treat some of these different tissues, a distal from the SCM and start working towards softening that SCM. And is that, uh, the bottom line here is that each one of these tissues are fascially connected and they can be able to carry signals. So I think that’s, that’s good. So we’ll move on to the next slide.

Yeah, sure. Yeah. That’s a good point, Matt, because then that includes, um, both channel points that can regulate tension in the sinew channels, but also, uh, points that are off channel and maybe include, uh, she points or muscle motor points and et cetera. Yeah, let’s go onto the next.

Yeah. Good. Okay, good.

So if we kind of look at the forearm, we have a more superficial layer of the San Angeles and new channel. And like I kind of already alluded to that. Is it going to start at the, uh, the hand with the tendons of the extensor digitorum commuting as muscle? So that’ll travel then up the posterior part of the forearm, and it’s going to attach to the lateral epicondyle, uh, that fascial linkage. And that was referring to then from the lateral epicondyle goes right into the lateral intermuscular septum. A lot of people might not be familiar with the lateral intermuscular septum. It’s highlighted in green in this image that I, we put the highlights in, but the image itself is from an anatomy Atlas from a German author Tillman. So you can see that little thin green line, just, just between the biceps and the triceps.

So this lateral intermuscular septum is the kind of fascial September wall between the biceps and the triceps, and it can transmit force. And in this case for the San jab sinew channel, it’ll transmit force up into the deltoids, particularly into the middle head of the deltoids. So that’s a more of an overview of that superficial aspect. Um, but also, uh, the medial head of the triceps can put tension into the lateral intermuscular septum. So there’s a lot of communication between the medial head of the triceps lateral intermuscular septum, uh, extensor digitorum communis. So those are all facially linked.

Good. All right.

So I guess we can go on to the next one

Next slide.

All right. So we have two more images from the same Atlas. So the first one on the left, we have, you can kind of see the little tools that are there to move apart. Um, and we’re going to see this on that cadaver video that we did. So in any of these types of things, everything’s so facially connected that you’d have to have a scalpel to kind of tease the way that fascia so that you can then come and move away those compartments, and then see deep, uh, below in this case, the extensors, the wrist extensors, especially extensor digitorum communis. And what you’re seeing is the super Nader, which then on the image on the right is a much cleaner image, cause it has all of that other stuff taken off. So you can see kind of the relationship on the picture of the left and then the deeper structure of the super Nader, uh, on the picture, on the right, also part of the sand Jassen you channel, and it especially links, you know, everything has a fascial linkage. This one has a fascial linkage that has a name, uh, into the lateral intermuscular septum. And that’s a radial collateral ligament. So you can see the image on the right really nicely shows that radial collateral ligament that has splashes spreading over the super Nader and then up above it, into that lateral inner muscular septum.

Yeah. Excellent. So let’s go back. Let’s say somebody

Has that sternocleidomastoid pain just to be able to keep it consistent. We could create the supernate or we could treat the lateral intermuscular septum. We could also treat San Jo one. We could treat the extensor digitorum communis and all of those points would end up affecting that part of the SEM that is affected by the sand Jobson channel.

Yeah. Yeah. That’s the hems is interesting too because, uh, the San Justin channel particularly seems to affect the GLA vicular head and then there’s any trigger point people, uh, listening and you might know, Oh yeah, the curricular had kind of refers oftentimes pain into the ear. It can be a headachy, uh, pain into the forehead and different places, but it often refers into the ear and can cause, um, positional vertigo. So then, you know, for me, I started thinking, well, geez, what, what would that make sense for the sand Dow channel to have some kind of effect in the ear and any, and any acupuncturist here? Of course they, yeah, of course you have John three, Sandra five, there’s a lot of, uh, relationships, the points on the San job channel with the, uh, with the ear. So that’s one that has, has an interesting correlation, but it, you know, like Matt, the sand supinate or other ones could be really involved.

I was just thinking San Joe seven, also being the sheet cleft point of that channel is the motor point for the extensor and dices. So that would be another point there too. Yeah.

And that one’s in the channel. We have that one listed in the list above, but it should be

All right.

We’re ready to move on to the next slide.

Sure. All right. So from the

Deltoids and especially the sand Dow channel has a relationship to the middle deltoids that then, uh, deltoids then go to the spine of the scapula and the chromium. And they pick up the, uh, superficial layer of the deep cervical fascia. Because if you look at the trajectory of the Sanjenis in your channel, it kind of comes from the back and it goes up the neck and then binds to the jaw. There’s really no muscle that has that trajectory that way, I guess the [inaudible] more superficial might, but it’s, it doesn’t seem to make sense for the San Joslin new channel. But if you look at this fascial layer of this superficial layer of the deep cervical fascia, it does have that trajectory and binds and connects them to the mandible, to the sort of angle of the mandible and then, um, ramus or the body of the mandible.

Um, so it sort of follows that trajectory and it wraps around the trapezius and wraps around the sternocleidomastoid. So it’s very intimately involved with both the upper trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid the digastric is in this region also. Uh, so if you think about the channel as being more of that cervical fascia, um, it might cross and include muscles that aren’t going in the, in the trajectory, in the pathway of the channel, but still has tensional relationships with the SCM seems like particularly the clavicular head of the SCM and then the upper trapezius and upper trapezius is a big muscle. Uh, I would say that particularly relevant are those fibers of the, uh, upper trapezius that go from the, a chromium to C seven, which are what you would be needling if you needle the motor point, uh, in maths book book, the motor point index it’s referred to as the part two fibers that many people needle from sand gel, 15 kind of angling upwards into gallbladder, uh, 20, 21, excuse me

Now, which is nice, that new technique is safe. It’s you, you’re not going to create a pneumothorax with that and linking the shower Yom channels, which is nice. Something that we take the teach in the smack program is acupuncture as an assessment. And this is going back, let’s go back to the SCM clavicular pain, so to speak, maybe somebody who’s having a cervicogenic headache is going to the side of the head in the sand jaw channel. We’ve provided already a list of different points that we could use that would help to say change range of motion, or start to decrease that headache. So acupuncture is an assessment. If somebody has that type of headache and maybe they have limited range of motion, they have a forward head posture. If we put the acupuncture needle into the extensor digitorum communis motor entry point, and then had the purse move to see if that actually changed the cheat within that San Jo myofascia channel, or we could use of course, San Jo one San gel seven, the lateral intermuscular septum. So we’re providing a number of different tissues that you can use for either a proximal injury or a distal injury using acupuncture as assessments. Really nice because it’s just giving you some ideas of what points actually make the greatest effect on that orthopedic evaluation on that range of motion on that pain, then you would take that needle out. And then when you’re actually going to be needling, the patient you’ll include that needle back in as part of the point prescription. Okay. Hope that was clear.

You already saw immediately that it had an effect on the dysfunction. Yes. CSS.

Yep. All right. So do we now go into the next conversation about the cervical fascia?

So this is a image that’s put together from this, uh, professional softwares. I go body, uh, they don’t have that little lines that are drawn. I, I painstakingly put them through, uh, through a illustrator like program, but, um, but cause I wanted to show the fascia because these programs, these 3d programs are very clunky and not as a muscle like the deltoids and traps and they’re like putting Legos on, um, which is not how the body is when you see the cadaver dissection. Obviously you’ll see this very clearly. So I put those white lines on the sort of show the fascia coming up from the middle deltoids, sweeping through the, uh, upper trapezius going across the SCM I say across, but it actually both the, um, STM and the traps are embedded kind of surrounded in that superficial layer of the deep cervical fascia. So it goes on both sides of the SCM and then goes to the mandible and links up with some of the fascia and the jaw and up into the temporality, uh, fascia, which would include the temporalis muscle.

In that case, you can also see those little, uh, your muscles that move, uh, and stabilize that region of the, uh, of the ear. Um, but the temporary, temporary Alice fashion, uh, the temporary, temporary Alice muscles. Interesting because that’s another point. And I think Maddie, you have the send the motor index as, as having, you can treat the motor point for headaches and various reasons, but this one has a, um, empirical use of, of, uh, reducing tension in the upper trapezius ipsilateral is another. Yeah. And you can see through the fascia, how that would be, be very much linked and help communicate that, that the attentional relationships between the two. So, you know, the take home, there’s a lot of things that are surrounded by this fascia, but really clinically the upper trapezius, especially those fibers that are kind of horizontal connecting to C7 as part two fibers and the [inaudible] head of the SCM that you haven’t, you can access from the motor point kind of in the region of stomach nine and angling through the muscle, but you can also get really good access to it through sand gel 16 and angling from Sanjay 16 cross Valley into the posterior portion of the SCM and, and, uh, um, connecting into that clavicular head.

We have a video on, um, the YouTube channel sports medicine, acupuncture, YouTube channel that shows both of those, um, both, uh, both the needle directions for the motor point and through that Sanjay 16.

All right. So the next slide is going to be, sorry, Brian, go ahead.

I said, I think that’s the, a it for the intro. Yeah. And I think we’re getting ready for the cadaver. Why don’t you set this up that? Sure. Yeah. So let’s just make sure that again, some people, if they do see this, um, passing by your computer or sec are really not going to enjoy it very much. It can actually really affect them deeply. So let’s be really careful of where we’re observing the following video, which is going to be of a cadaver dissection. Um, let’s make sure that there’s no screenshots, no sharing of the recordings and no downloading, please with this, we don’t want to share this kind of information. This is just for us medical professionals to be able to learn from. So then can we now see the video please? And then I believe there’s,

So we’re look at the sand house in your channel, starting with the forearm. We have the extensor digitorum communis exposed extensor digitorum, communis in a different fascial compartment. Then the extensor indices, so different fascial compartment than the extensor indices. Here we go. And a different fascia compartment. Then the extensor digit I minimized. So indices digitized minimize. So we’ll put those back into place so we can see them in relationship extensor, digitorum communis comes up. The arm attaches to the lateral epicondyle it also communicates into the lateral intermuscular septum, but has a communication into the medial medial head of the triceps, which there’s a little part of it on the lateral aspect there, medial aspect of the triceps also puts tension into that lateral intermuscular septum. So San Jo has more to do with the medial head of the triceps all the way up communicating with the deltoids. We feel that that communicates more through the middle fibers of the deltoids and then into that portion of the upper trapezius that attaches to C7. So those part two fibers of the upper trapezius and another point we’ll be able to do a little bit more dissection and start to look underneath these structures to see the, a super Nadir, which we’re starting to see a little bit of the super Nader right there, part of the sand gel channel.

All right, great. So let’s get to the next slide. All right. So some of the common injuries associated with this particular manufacturer, Jean Jim will be distal the EDC tenure synovitis. So the, on the wrist itself, the tendon that is going to be in the middle of San John for an extra point zone Tron. This is a common area for risk tenure, synovitis of the extensor digitorum communis and also super Nader syndrome. So the super Nader being deep to large intestine nine, and we’re going to actually talk quite a bit about the SuperNet. We’re going to highlight it in this podcast because it’s a great mimic for lateral epicondylitis. Um, this particular podcast also, um, will parallel the blog that we have on the sports medicine, acupuncture website, sports medicine, acupuncture.com, where we discuss supinate or syndrome. And we’ve got a couple of videos also, including a mild fascia release technique.

That’s very effective for helping to release the Supernanny. And we’ll talk about that in a little bit more. So another injury that you can get in the Sandra Jean Jean will be lateral epicondylitis in particular, when the extensor digitorum communis is involved, which it commonly is. However, with lateral epicondylitis, we also have the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis, and those will be more in the large sinew channel. So the lateral epicondylitis will be the EDC or the extensor digitorum communis involvement. Then we have our tricep strain, which can occur around San Jo 10 and actually go all the way, even the lateral, following that Sanjay channel toward the Antonius, the medial head of the triceps, which is involved or categorize within the San jar. Gene gin is one of the more frequent muscles out of the three triceps that become strained. That can cause, um, a tendinopathy there around San Jo 10. Then of course, as we discussed earlier, any kind of muscle tension headaches, they might be contributed from that cervical fascia and also the, um, um, looking at the clivia head, the SCM. So let’s, let’s focus a little bit more now on the super Nader syndrome. Like I said, which it can, it can mimic lateral epicondylitis because it does attach to the lateral epicondyle. So let’s go to the next slide, please.

So the supernate or being in the deep layer that you saw in Tillman’s images. So if we took the extensors off on this image, you’re going to see that supinate or that you also saw on the cadaver dissection. So the radial nerve, as it comes down from C5, C6, C6, C7 follows along the sand job channel around large intestine 11 region. It actually bifurcates. So the superficial radial nerve travels along the large intestine channel. And then the other bifurcation is the deep branch of the radial nerve. It’s also called the poster interosseous nerve. So deep radial nerve and post interosseous nerve is synonymous that posterior interosseous nerve dives down through the supinate or through this fibers canal card that called the arcade of fros. Now with overuse in the super Nader, either being in a lock long or a lock short position, it can entrap that poster interosseous nerve and cause a parasthesia along that sand jaw channel, but it can also mimic lateral epicondylitis. So lateral epicondyle can actually be a little bit tender in that region, but most of the pain is going to be around large intestine nine region. Let’s go to the next

Slide.

So this is from a previous dissection that we’ve had. You can see that the radial nerve is there on the left, the, the blue ribbon there, which is actually a surgical glove, just cut up tied around. So you can see that bifurcation. So the elbow is going to be where that blue glove, that blue little ribbon there that’s the bifurcation. So you can see that post interosseous nerve traveling through the super Nader muscle and then exits and follows along the sand jaw channel. If that muscle, like I said, from overuse and traps, that nerve, and that can cause a parasthesia within that region within the sand jog channel will cause pain, raw, large intestine, large intestine, nine large intestine, 10 deep, but it can also cause around lateral epicondyle. So it could mimic lateral epicondylitis. So a differential diagnosis is going to be needed. Lateral epicondylitis will not have a parasthesia if there is pain at the lateral epicondyle and there is a parasthesia, especially traveling in the super Nader region, San Angelo channel, then you think super Nader syndrome probably want to say anything about that, or should we jump right into assessment

Simple. And it’s not as relevant for super Nadir syndrome, but that a superficial branch of the radial nerve then travels down the ally channel. As Matt said, it goes deep to the brachioradialis. So you can kind of see on that left edge of the slide, you can kind of see the brachioradialis pulled off to the side. So then that, that, uh, branch of the nerve goes deep to the brachioradialis. Just that that’s all just to add that in.

Okay. Cool. All right, let’s go to the next slide. Let’s talk about some assessment. So when a patient comes in with lateral elbow pain with possible parasthesia into the lateral forearm, along the course of the San Angelo channel, you’re starting to think more supinate or syndrome than true lateral epicondylitis. Now palpation of the supernatural muscle will be very tender and possibly listed parasthesia. You want to compare symptoms to the supernatural muscle on the opposite side, that’s always going to be very important. The supinate or manual muscle tests repeated four to six times will often create pain in the large attest nine region Garcia, Tencent 10 region, maybe even lung five. And it might extend along to the lateral epicondyle as well. So we’re going to actually go over that manual muscle test, a mills test and cousins tests. Those tests are for lateral epicondylitis. So therefore if you use mills tests and cousins tests and they do elicit pain at the lateral epicondyle then possibly there is some extensor involvement as well. However, if there’s parasthesia please think about the [inaudible].

Now the patient may also report that the forearm and hand feel weak, heavy, or also uncoordinated because of this nerve entrapment. It can cause muscle weakness. So let’s go to the next slide if we would please. All right. So cousins tests and mills tests, most people already know what those are. If not, it’s very simple to be able to YouTube that Google it. Um, it’s, they’re, they’re common tests. Now, the supinate or manual muscle test is not so common by putting the patient into this particular position. And you’re going from a supinated position. You’re going to try to break them out of super nation and going into nation. Now, if you do this four to six times, if the person does have supinate or syndrome, many times, it it’ll become sore in the large intestine and larger test 10 region. And it may also start to elicit that parasthesia so you can use this manual muscle test as confirmation.

All right. So let’s talk about where the actual motor entry points are, the radial nerve into the supernatant. Next let’s go to the next slide. Okay. So there’s two, one’s going to be approximately one to one and a half soon distal, and one soon, our half a soon radio to lung five. So if you take your finger and put it on a lung five, please, in that cubital crease, you’re going to be on the radial side of the biceps tendon in the elbow crease lung five. Now move about one to one and a half soon distal toward the wrist. Now go half assume to the radial side, deep to this region here is going to be one of the motor entry points onto the SuperNet or which we’re going to have a video. That’s going to describe this a bit more in detail. Now, if you can go too deep to larger test and nine, so large intestine nine is going to be three soon down from large intestine 11.

All right. So we’re going to separate the breaker radiologists and the extensor digitorum, uh, uh, extensor digitorum readouts, longest separate those tissues to large intestine nine press against the radial bone, which is usually a great sensation. And that will cause quite a bit of sensate caught quite a bit of pain in that area. That’s going to be another motor entry point for the super Nader. So let’s take a look at the next video, which is going to describe location and then also the needle technique. And then after that, we can take any questions that you guys may have, or we can have some, uh, closing comments,

The supernate or muscle has two motor points. One’s going to end up being distal from lung five on the other. One’s going to actually be located a large intestine nine. So let’s take a look here. So from lung five, we know that’s going to be in the cubital crease here on the radial side of the bicipital tendon. If we drop inferior one to one and a half. So, and just depending on the size of the patient, and then we go to the radio side one soon. Now, palpating you’ll feel the break your radiologists, when that break your radiologists at this location, you’ll divide the brachioradialis and you’ll fall right into a space. Now from this space here, we just keep massaging that tissue, keep massaging that tissue. Okay. Separating the brachioradialis. Okay. Now I can have the patient who, which is in supine. He’s in super nation right now.

He’s going to go into pronation and now going into superannuation, and I can feel that tissue popping up. I’m going to adjust my finger. I feel a little bit more here from super nation now into pronation. There we go. Okay. So then the needle technique would be looking at the supernatant from this location, which is one, one and a half and a half soon lateral separating the space between, between the brachioradialis and opening that tissue up toward that bone. So you’re going to be kneeling perpendicular, and you saw how I found that super near by going to pronation and supination to the skin directly toward that radius. Now let’s be mindful that the brachial artery is going to be traveling along that pericardium channel. So I want to make sure that we’re not kneeling deep in the pericardium channel in this region. So the needle technique for this particular point, be right toward that radius.

Now we can also need the supernate are based on large intestine, nine large intestine nine. We find large intestine 11, which is going to be at the end of the transverse cubital crease to large intestine five. We know that this is going to be 12 soon. So large intestine nine is going to be three soon inferior because the space between 11 and 10 is too soon. So from large destined five to large intestine 11 let’s divide that in half. There’s our six Mark. All right. So then now if we divide 11 and the halfway point and half, that will be three soon, which will be large test and nine large destined nine, three soon down from large intestine 11. So again, let’s feel for that break here, radiologists, I can quickly do a little manual muscle test or resistance test for the breaker radiologists. I’m going to have the patient just press up against me here and that break your radiologists a little bit harder, buddy. And that break your radius pops right up here. All right. So then now I’m just going to separate between the brachioradialis and the extensor carpi radialis longest and press right into that radial bone, which is going to be pretty darn tender for him. And I can feel that re the supernatural muscles start to pop up. When he goes into super nation, pronation is lengthening super nation. There it is right there. I’m going to needle here, large intestine nine directly toward that radius.

So we’ve located large intestine 11, we’ve located large, large intestine nine, which is three down from 11 we’ve identified where the brachioradialis is. Now we’re going to just slide our finger right into that crevice between the brachioradialis and the extensor carpi, radialis longest separate that tissue there, separate the tissue, and I can feel that radius. All right. So then now moving into superannuation, I feel the muscle popup pronation. I feel it sliding. I feel the muscle pop-up into super nation. All right. So the needle technique is going large intestine nine directly towards

The radius. And then we propagate

This muscle is innervated by the poster interosseous nerve or the deep radial nerve, which is a branch. The superficial nerve goes to the large intestine channel and the deep branch comes down to the posterior interosseous nerve or deep radios synonymous, which then goes into the arcade or fros for the super Nader syndrome. And that’s a lecture that we have in this particular program and this particular module, this is going to be super Nader at large test nine. Let’s take a look at how we’re going to needle the super Nader from the, uh, lung channel.

[inaudible]

Lung five, we dropped down one and a half. We moved to the radio side a half, maybe three quarters of sun. Sometimes it’s one soon, depending on the size of the patient, feel for the radius, that’s going to be your key. Now we’re going to separate the brachioradialis here. All right. So on this side of the brachioradialis Okay. And I can have the patient pronate and supinate, and I can fill the muscle pop-up with super nation. We insert directly toward the radius

[inaudible] and propagate.

Okay. So the two motor points for the SuperNet, and that’s how we would treat that. But of course, that’s just treating the supernatural. We’d have to include more points to be able to soften that, that Sanchez senior channel, and also look at the person’s posture as well. Um, those were just two points to be able to be the super Nader. Again, we can go into extensively SCORM communis [inaudible] St. John for lateral intermuscular septum, the medial head going into the curricular head of the SCM to help, to connect to the entire San Jiao channel with that. Then of course, giving exercises that will help with the pronator, Terese and opera off in the supernatural. Many times the pronator chairs will be in a locked short position. I need to be stretched and the supernatural will be strengthened, but of course there’s never an always with all of this.

So it has to be assessed properly with that. And the pronoun Terry is part of the pericardium sinew channel. So it makes sense to treat that for both reasons. Yeah. Good. So internally and externally related of course. Awesome. Well, that’s it for our sand job channel quick question. Just cause I think other people might have it too. Um, and I think you said it you’re treating both of those points or is there a clinically a reason why you treat one or the other of them? Um, or is it really both for supinate or syndrome? I like to treat both of them because it is such a, a long muscle with a number of different attachments to it. So usually I’ll try to be able to get both because if I miss one, then I’ll probably get the other yeah. Got it. Yeah. Good question. Thanks for saying that.

All right. Well, Brian, was there anything else that you want to close this out with? No, no. As usual, of course, thanks to American Acupuncture Council, having the opportunity, do these webinars. Yeah. Thank you everybody for attending. We really, really appreciate this. And also, Oh, you just see that coming up. Lauren Brown is going to end up being here next week. If you have not heard Lauren speak before, he’s very energetic. He’s very knowledgeable. He’s a great person as well. So that’s going to be a good show for next week. Um, Brian, thank you very much. It’s always a fun time with you and thanks everybody. Really appreciate it. Have a great one. Bye-bye

[inaudible].

 

 

So as Matt said this time, we’re just doing the same thing, elevated ileum, but it’s its relationship to the shoulder girdle and then shoulder dysfunction and other upper extremity type problems. But we’ll give some more specific examples, but just keep in mind that there could be a whole ton of different, dysfunctions that could come from just one simple thing, like an elevated ilium.”

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Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

Hello, everyone and happy new year. Thank you very much for attending. My name is Matt Callison.  Hi, thanks for attending. I’m Brian Lau.  We’re from ACU sport education and the sports medicine acupuncture certification program. Thank you to the American Acupuncture Council for having us. We have a sports acupuncture webinar. It’s always really fun to be able to do this once a month or every other month. This particular one, we’ve got more information for you. We have such a good time last month with Ian Armstrong, who’s the teacher of the postural assessment and corrective exercise class in the smack program. Brian and myself had a great time discussing elevated ilium and his contribution to medial knee pain had explored the different sinew channels and different acupuncture points and exercises that can be used to help to correct this. Then Brian, I was thinking that’d be great to be able to actually do something similar, looking at an elevated ilium and its contribution to a superior shift of the scapula or an elevated ilium and the injuries that that can cause. And some exercises that would be useful to apply after the acupuncturist acupuncture treatment. So, unfortunately though, Ian had some cut amendments, he wouldn’t be able to join us. So Brian and I are going to go ahead and take this over. Um, Brian, what do you think about us going to the intro slide? And if you have any words or so you want to share,

Uh, no, no, basically I guess just the small thing is that, um, elevated ilium could cause a whole ton of kind of, uh, potential pain patterns of low back pain, hip pain, a whole bunch of them. Last time we chose to see how it can relate to the lower extremities, especially the knee for medial knee pain. So it’s just an example, example to see how to start prescribing exercises, how to add them into the full, comprehensive treatment. So as Matt said this time, we’re just doing the same thing, elevated ileum, but it’s its relationship to the shoulder girdle and then shoulder dysfunction and other upper extremity type problems. But we’ll give some more specific examples, but just keep in mind that there could be a whole ton of different, uh, dysfunctions that could come from just one simple thing, like an elevated ilium. Hmm.

All right. Well, let’s go to the next slide. I think that’s a good segue for you. Want to go ahead and start with this one?

Yeah. So, uh, with this image, uh, again, we’re, we’re focusing in on a postural disparity, uh, we picked an elevated ilium cause it’s clinically relevant. It’s very common. You see it a lot in, uh, in clinic and you see both how it can relate. Like I said to, to local pain patterns, like low back pain, et cetera, but, but how it really becomes, you know, since so much weight transfers through the hip, it’s really one of the key structures, uh, that determined cemetery for a lot of the rest of the body. So if you can balance the pelvis that goes a long way in and of itself to balance the shoulder girdle, to balance the lower extremity knee position, foot position, et cetera. Uh, so it’s not the only thing. Um, but it’s a really a big thing. So we’ll look at its relationship to the shoulder girdle today and give some exercises review, uh, refer back to last times podcast where we looked at some exercises for the ilium itself.

Um, and then we’ll look at some exercises for shoulder girdle, but then how to combine those with acupuncture treatments. So in this image, you see this gentleman on the right there’s a elevated and you can kind of see the schematic, um, image. You can see that he has an elevated ilium on the left. So he follow, uh, you know, the line from the top of each, uh, iliac crest. You can see an elevated ilium on the left. We’ll look at some other ways you can measure it in the second, uh, then look at just for now the relationship that calm. And this is the most common way that it would present is that you’d have a balancing, you know, in the girdle of the shoulders, the shoulder girdle balance, where it’s going to start to compensate to that elevated ilium. And in this case, you see that elevated scapula on the right. And that’s probably the most common way that this would present. It could do it differently, but this is definitely the most common opposite elevated scapula or a superior shift. You might call that

Just want to emphasize as well that Brian was talking about balancing the elevated ilium or any kind of, uh, ileum type of partial disparities. I mean, the reason why it’s, you can see that it’s going to be the middle section of the skeleton. That’s going to affect what’s happening above and below in addition to housing, the dantien and the kidneys just above. So by balancing that aspect that helps, helps all kinds of different things they acupuncturist can be treating from pelvic floor dysfunction, lower jaw disharmony, OB GYN, middle job disharmony. So looking at balancing at the muscle skeletal systems, not just for orthopedic, it’s also for helping those on food. So that’s, that’s great. And this is what we emphasize in, in the smack program is trying to be able to get that elevated ilium or any kind of partial disparities and pelvis to go ahead and treat that first, which I’m sure a lot of practitioners will actually go for that as well. Yeah. Brian, before we go to the next slide. Okay.

Yeah, the we’re going to be zeroing in, in a second more on the shoulder and scapular position, but in this particular model, you can also really see the change in the position of the neck. And I’ll just give you a very simple way to see it. If you could picture that ilium elevated. I think I mirror image near my right hands up, but I’m trying to make it look like my left hand to kind of match this, this model, if, uh, the aliens elevated on the left, the person’s not going to stand in such a way that they’re, they’re leaning, you know, the leaning tower of PISA over on that side. And everything’s pointing, you know, uh, to the left, they’re going to find some place to compensate that someplace could be multiple places. It could be in the spine, which you see a little bit of in this model.

It can be in the shoulder girdle, it can be in the neck, they’re going to find some way to get their eye and their head and, um, ear position, you know, the equilibrium of the body a little bit more balanced. So if the shoulder girls are really fixed, maybe they’re going to find a way to do that all in the neck. Um, but the common one, the, the very frequent thing you see at least, um, that’s going to be part of this dynamic is the, uh, contralateral shoulder being higher and the, you know, compared to the hip, so left hip right shoulder, right hip left.

Great. As you can see the image on the right, the patient has an elevated ilium on the left and looks like there is elevation on the right as well. He does have a little lateral tilt to the right with the scapula quite. I mean, with the head that Brian was just talking about. So one of the muscles that we’re going to actually the only muscle that we’re talking about, primary muscle that we’re going to be talking about as well, the levator scapula. So can you see where the levator scapula attaches on the image on the left, the superior medial border of the scapula close to small tests in 13, and then it’s other attachment is going to be the transfers process of C1, C2, C3, C4. So the superior shift of the scapula, and you’ve got a shortening of that. Levator scapula, small tests and CGU channel that we’re going to get into a little bit more in this webinar, in a lock short position, it’s pulling the neck to the lateral side. So multitude of injuries can be occurring from this that we’re going to be getting into. All right. All right. Well then let’s go to the next slide. The quick review. This is what we talked about last month about measuring the ileum. Um, so you can see the middle image. There’s the hands are coming in on the side, on the lateral side, and the fingers are placed at a level line, right on top of that alien, it gives you an idea of where side is going to be elevated.

Well, I’m a person that, that doesn’t work for the camera position. So, well,

Go ahead, Brian. You can finish.

No, I just wanted to say that just for people to know that the, if you’re measuring that you’d be right behind the person that mats moved to the side to be able to see whatever his hands are. So just that heads up.

Yeah. True. And then functional anatomy from, um, OHS, overhead squat from the national Academy of sports medicine. Looking also at what happens with an elevated Dalian was usually an asymmetrical hip shift. And there’s a whole slew of sinew channel imbalances that occurs with this. And once we see this kind of posture where we’re automatically thinking of different acupuncture points that we can treat for locally adjacent and distant of the primary channels and the Sr channels, in addition to what this kind of Bosch is going to be doing to the organ.

All right, well, let’s go to the next slide please.

All right. So here, you’ve got elevated scapula or also called a superior shift of the scapula, and it’s going to be associated with a lock short levator scapula that we discussed earlier, which you see here on this individual’s left side. This individual has an elevated ilium on the right often like Brian was saying it’s probably most of the times, but not all the time. There’s never an always is that the opposing side will have a superior shift of the scapula. Sometimes you’ll see a superior shift of the scapula on the same side of an elevated ilium, but what we’re going to be discussing here will still apply. All right? So this posture can lead to many different muscle and channel imbalances that we’re going to be discussing just a few of them. Um, some of the injuries that can happen with this will be rotator cuff tendinopathy, but Ron boy, minor constrain thoracic outlet syndrome. And there’s more Brian, do you want to say anything before we go to the next line?

Uh, well, I think we also have, uh, in the slide or is this the next one? Yeah, the downward downwardly rotated, uh, scapular position. And I think we have a little bit more on the next slide, so we can go over it a bit more there. Um, but uh, if you look at the scapula in this position, the left side, that I’ve looked at the glenoid cavity. So the, um, I have a little scapula here, so, uh, I think this look more like my, uh, left side of your looking through the rib cage at the front surface of the scapula, the glenoid fossa would go up. That would be upward rotation. This patient has more of a downward rotation of the scapula. And that’s pretty typical when the levator scapula shorten. We’ll talk about this again in the next slide, but, um, but that’ll play into some of the, um, discussions we have coming up in a few, few slides also. Okay. So next please.

All right, so this video’s not playing, maybe if you click on it, it’ll play.

I see. Okay.

So it’s not playing unfortunately. Well, that’s what happens with technology sometimes. So let’s just walk there.

I think it’s coming, isn’t it? Oh yeah. I can see them working on it. It looks good. There it goes.

Thank you. Okay. So one of the actions of the levator scapula as the name suggests it’s going to elevate the scapula. Now, what this is not showing is that you do have elevation in the scapular, but if you look at the origin, the assertion or the distal proximal attachments, it will also downwardly rotate that scaffold. If you will, Brian, can, you should have downward rotation again in your scapula.

Yeah. So tell me, Matt. And you can tell me if this is a case, this is the right scapula, but I think since we’re on, I think everything’s mirrored image. I’m trying to look at, make it look like the same. So does that look like the right side?

Yes. But can you do us a favor? Can you go ahead and keep it in front of you? Because it blends very well with the white background. Yeah. Okay. That looks really great, but you don’t have to raise it up a little bit, at least on mine now. Okay, good.

Yeah. So you’re seeing through my rib cage to the front surface of the scapula levator scapula would be attaching here to see one, two, three, and four transverse processes, a muscle of the small intestines in your channel, and it would lift or elevate the scapula. And at the same time it would soaps and please me or imaging, it’s hard. It would bring the side of the neck down to that side to its side, bend the head, but we’re talking mainly about the scapular position. So elevating the scapula. Okay.

That’s great. So let’s go to the next slide, please. I don’t think we’re going to talk a little bit more about the rotation. Okay.

[inaudible]

Yeah. And this one we’ll look at the downward rotation of the scapula

That’s there’s upward rotation downward. So when you see green about levator scapula, that’s when it’s shortening concentric contraction, it’s active and the Red’s going to be a lengthening contraction. So green is going to be upward, rotate downward rotation, and then you’ve got your upward rotation. So in a locked short levator scapula, you can see how it have a propensity to be stuck in a downward rotation, which will then when you’re raising the arm to shoulder abduction, like the scapula humeral rhythm, that images that’s on the right there, the greater tubercle, a big prominence on the humerus or the super spine EDIS and infraspinatus. And on the opposite side, the bicipital long head tendon can come up and hit that at chromium and cause a tendinopathy and impingement. There’s one more image. I think that will also be able to help with this. Um, can we go to the next slide?

Yeah, there we go.

Yeah. So then this would be when the levator scapula has been placing that scaffold into a downward rotation, as the arm goes into abduction, then the propensity for that greater tubercle to hit that a chromium is much, much higher leading to injuries that we were talking about. So all of this gives us actually protocols to be able to treat this, but for right now levator scapula is going to be a big one to do. Um, and we will talk about exercises here in a second. Brian, do you want to add anything to this?

Yeah. So, uh, the main thing we’re looking at those is very, I guess, biomechanical, we’re looking at particular muscles in this case, the levator scapula and how it’s going to elevate the scapula and how it’s going to tend to hold the scapula into that downer rotation of it’s shortened. It’s going to prevent the scapula from being able to follow the arm position, right. That would be normal movement to help keep that space between the acromion and the head of the humerus, uh, open. So it doesn’t pinch structures like the supraspinatus tendon, the bicep, uh, biceps tendon. So you’d want the scapula to be able to come upward and upward rotation as you’re going into AB duction. But if it’s kind of held too firmly in place by an overtight levator scapula and maybe some other structures, then it’s going to prevent that scapula from moving and then the arms going to bump into the chromium and, uh, that can lead to a lot of different pain patterns of the shoulder.

So that’s a very biomechanical view. That’s great, that’s great information and of itself, but then we have to remember that we have this whole, you know, really beautiful, intricate channel system. And, uh, the levator scapula, the muscle we’re kind of looking at in this case is a muscle of the small intestines and new channel. So we can needle it at the motor point, but we might include small intestine channel points to help contribute to a more thorough therapeutic outcome. We started with the elevated ilium, uh, and the quadratus lumborum is a big muscle that’s involved with the elevated ilium as are the AAD doctors, the thigh and hip add doctors. Those are muscles of the liver sinew channel. So we have this midday, midnight channel relationship that’s involved with, uh, maybe this local problem. We have a very, um, more comprehensive channel perspective that we can look at and start including points to directly affect the elevated Lam like the quadratus lumborum like add Dr. Longest liver channel points, maybe something like liver five, um, in combination with small intestine channel points and more local needling at the small intestine channel sinews. And then we can add other points in our acupuncture treatment based on the specific injury and other things we’re finding and you know, this person, blood deficient or inefficient or something like that. So this is starting to paint a more of a comprehensive picture that we’re looking at.

That’s something we find a lot in our own clinical practices, looking at the midday and midnight relationship between the liver on the small tests and channel, especially when there’s a shoulder abduction problems, such as what we’re seeing this slide, um, elevated ilium and shoulder abduction problems, pretty darn common. You’ll see that a lot in the clinic. Um, if you would, when you’re looking at the scapula, you guys, I take a look at that superior medial border of the scapula. That’s where the levator scap is going to be attaching where many people have that five Brodick tension in there that many of us will go ahead and needle right through that, um, that levator scapula, as we talked about before, it’s going to be attaching to the C1 through C4, transverse processes, attached to that. Then it goes down and it travels to the superior medial border.

Like I said, it blends in seamlessly with the super spy Natus muscle that’s located in the supraspinous fossa in this particular image. If you go disorder, large tests and 16 would be, then you’ve got large and tests and 15, just on the other side of the chromium, hopefully you guys are following along with this large test at 15 is where the super spine Natus tendon is going to be attaching. It’s usually about a quarter of an inch to an AF, probably five, eight, five eights of an inch wide blending into the capsule and attaching right onto the, um, a greater tubercle. Then from there, you’ve got your triceps part of the small test of senior channel, and then also going all the way down to flexor carpi on narrow switch. We talk a lot about the flexor carpi on there. Motor point is a magical, yeah, I’m going to use the word magical because it is empirical point that will soften the, um, a distal attachment, uh, levator scapula 99% of the time when you do actually get that flexor carpi on there’s motor point, right? It will soften that attachment side pretty dramatically. And this is something that we’ve been teaching in the program for probably about 10 years or so. It’s a really nice disappoint to use with levator scapula, shortening and pain at that proximal attachment. Brian, you wanna say anything else before we go on?

Oh, no, that’s good.

They were actually kind of moving right into, uh, exercises now. So the next slide, please.

So

Last month, these were some exercises or exercise, different levels of the, um, figure four crossover. That’s working quite a bit on the piriformis, this exercise. And a lot of the exercises that we use are based on [inaudible] work. Um, what we’ve done is we’ve actually looked at the different angles as far as the functional anatomy, the sinew channels, and we’ve modified his work, which actually happens quite a bit with people’s methods and techniques is that other people have good ideas about it. And then just kind of form it in a slightly different way. But we did want to give a shout out to Peter Garcia for his miraculous work and an exercise prescription, what he’s done over the years. Um, so again with this, this is what we’ve done for the elevated ilium one exercise, and that’s going to be discussed a lot further in last month’s podcast. And also we have a blog about it as well in the sports medicine, acupuncture.com website. Let’s go to the next side. We’ll talk about exercises where we can use for a levator scapula or a superior shifted the, um, this exercise for, um, elbow press is an exceptional exercise. Brian, do you want to start with that or do you want me to go?

Um, I can start and there’s a little bit of a, um, dialogues of you need to go back and look at it after the recording it’ll give a step-by-step, but the idea is you’re giving a little bit of a press of the elbows into the floor, but more importantly is you’re bringing this, the shoulder blades, the scapula together. So towards the midline in down. So, you know, in this case, levator scapula is going to tend to pull. It might be on one side, but pull that scapula up. So you’re D pressing using lower traps and using, uh, the, the rhomboids and middle traps to bring the shoulder blades together and down. So it’s the same time opening the chest and dropping the shoulder blades.

Hmm.

I don’t know if you got one dad, anything else about it, Matt?

Yeah, I was just looking at the image and how hands and Ian is enjoying it, and it’d be what the scapula is doing. And then 10% of it is going to actually be pressing into the floor. So this is a strong scapular stabilization exercise that works great after needling, um, or doing acupuncture to the levator scapula, pectoralis, minor, small tests and senior channel, um, a number of different points that we could use with this one. This is a simple exercise and kind of a triple star exercise that you can use even to advanced people, um, because it does require quite a bit of concentration to really get those scapulas to really form down and lock in. Then the next exercise is actually called just a second. Uh,

This is a short format, so we can’t go into too much, but, uh, if you go back at some point, if you want to look at the recording and look at the movements of the scapula, we were talking about levator scapula, but pec minor muscle of the lung sinew channel would be involved in a lot of these too, because it’s the antagonist agonist, antagonist relationship with levator scapula because it’s going to depress the scapula. So if it’s really short, maybe the levator scapula has to fight against it, but it also works with the levator scapula and downward rotation of the, of the scap. So I like this exercise in this case also because of that, um, opening and lengthening of the pec minor and kind of normalizing the tension of that, which is kind of a, not the direct channel we’re looking at, we’re looking at the small intestines in your channel, but how maybe the lungs and new channels coming in and relating to this picture, this exercise would be given after the acupuncture treatment. So maybe we’ve needled the pec minor on that side to make it more, um, accessible for the patient right away, you know, their body’s ready for the exercise kind of prime because we’ve reduced, um, tension in the pec minor and allow, or allowing them to more effortlessly do this exercise. Yeah. Cool.

And Brian, I’m sure we kind of rushed with this. There’s a lot of things that we really didn’t talk about. Like the lower trapezius being an antagonist to the levator scap elevation and depression and the literature, easiest being large attachments in your channel. So a size to be able to see that internal and externally related channels of the lung pectoralis, minor, lower trapezius, large intestine being called into Plex. What does that mean? Well, in our mind, if you would needle the motor points of each one of those, you’re already signaling those two mild fascial Sr channels. So therefore if you compliment that signal with more acupuncture points, adjacent and distal, it has to have an effect on those particular muscles. Cause it’s the signaling system that we use in acupuncture. Brian, you must anything about that? That’s good. All right. Cool. All right. So again, um, this elbow press is a great exercise to use as a preliminary exercise. So what about the next exercise please?

Yeah. Okay. This is one of our favorites. I would say triple star, maybe even quadruple started this. Um, this is an exercise that takes a lot of concentration and how we modified it a bit from how it was originally taught is we are increasing the, uh, or decreasing the thoracic flection. So we’re increasing thoracic extension. Let’s walk through that. So the first position the person’s going to have their knuckles on tide young, usually the middle finger there. They’re going to keep the wrist straight. The elbows are going to be out. As you can see, the knees are going to be at 90 degrees and hips are going to be at 90 degrees. We asked the person to go ahead and bring their elbows together toward the ceiling, keeping their fingers right at Thai Ong. All right. So by them doing that, you’ve got scapular protraction.

Then we ask the patient to begin the movement back down, bringing their elbows back down, leading with the rhomboids, leading with that medial border of the scapula and start to bring them together. All right. So you’ve got protraction and retraction. This exercise is really getting the agonist and the antagonist of those muscle groups working together. Now the emphasis, once the patient is able to do this success, now we actually increase it a little bit. We ask the patient to bring their elbows together when they’re going up to the ceiling, but above their nose. So what I’ll do is I’ll actually put my finger right above their nose and try to have the patient, bring their elbows up toward the nose, which is very, very difficult in order to do that. You really need quite a bit of thoracic extension, which is a wonderful thing to do when somebody has thoracic flection in those upper vertebrae, right?

For example, in upper cross syndrome and that head is forward. So this is a great exercise for that. It’s gonna, it’s gonna work the levator scapula quite a bit, a lot of the scapular stabilizers. And it’s, it’s definitely one of our favorites to use. This is also something that you may want to use with somebody who has upper jaw problems, for example, asthma or any kind of, of, uh, lung problems after COVID maybe C O P D, because how it’s working the front, move in the back shoe points and getting those muscles to be able to work in coordination. It’s going to work the channels as well and coordinate the channels.

Yeah. We had a question, uh, regarding this one, if somebody had a difficult timeline on the floor, so we cover stuff like this, a lot in the program where we have a multiple amounts of different exercises that can be done. That would be maybe a simpler exercise. If it’s somebody who has a difficult time of getting on the floor, cause maybe they’re not very conditioned. So I might go with a more simplistic exercise, but there is an actual variation of this, this, this exercise that that’s a little different, but it’s the same concept that can be done seated with a strap. It’s a little bit more isometric where you’re pushing out against the strap and lifting and doing some similar, similar, uh, focus. Um, but that would be, uh, adequate for somebody also, if, if that was, uh, you know, they were ready for that exercise, they could do the seated. Maybe they can’t get on the floor cause they have a shoulder injury and they, they can’t support himself. So you can definitely adapt this one to a seated position or you could just give them a more simple exercise.

Yeah. Cool. Good one. All right. So then what we talked about last time was using acupuncture as assessment, but also, um, using intradermal needles for increasing range of motion or decreasing the amount of pain during an exercise. For example, if somebody is having a hard time appropriate deceptively, trying to figure out how to do this exercise, or they may be limited in their range of motion, kind of stuck, or perhaps they’re feeling a little bit, um, slight pain or minimal pain with it, but it’s inhibiting them from doing the exercise. This is where intradermal needles on actual ordinary vessel points, but also you can use channel points to actual ordinary vessel points works pretty, pretty darn amazing. This is something that we teach in this program. And for those of you that have the sports medicine acupuncture textbook, let me think it’s in chapter four toward the end with, uh, exercise before treatment and exercise after treatment using intradermal needles. So it’s in that section chapter four. So what you’re about to see is a video of the smack program and the postural assessment and practice exercise. And there is a student there that’s having difficulty with actually doing this exercise. And so we’re applying intradermal needles based on what motion was the most painful or difficult. Okay. So let’s look at the next slide, the movie.

Now we know

That you can’t hear, let’s just read

[inaudible]. That is so awesome.

Yeah.

I still love her expressions so far. Um, yeah, so we can probably advance it to the next slide. We use a pine X needles from Sarah and, and you can get those from Lhasa OMS. Um, the point to a millimeters by 1.2 millimeter, um, that’s some of the best ones because it’s large enough to be able to create a sensation, but not large enough to be uncomfortable during movement. So those seem to be worked out pretty well with us. Yeah.

Uh, you can send them home with, uh, I mean, to keep them in for the patient for a few days to, while they’re performing the exercises to assist, you know, to keep that stimulation going. Yeah. Cool. Well, great. I think that’s,

Well, I mean, we could talk about this for hours, but no, I have, it’s regarded gone six minutes over that. So, um, thanks very much you guys, and I think we’re going to be scheduled again in February or March. Hopefully we’ll see you again then. Yeah.

And the next week, uh, Sam Collins is on, I’ll say I was going to be there. Awesome. Yeah,

I talk he’s, he’s hilarious. He’s really quite a sharp as a tack and he’s, he’s fun to listen to. So thank you very much. The American acupuncture council, Brian. You’re awesome as always. And thanks you guys. And hopefully we’ll be connecting again soon.

All right. Great. Thanks everyone. Goodbye.

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Nanopuncture with Clayton Shiu & Poney Chiang

 

Hi, my name is Poney Chiang from Toronto Canada. I met my opinion education provider from new everyday.net. Welcome to today’s live Facebook broadcast for American Acupuncture Council. My guest today is Dr. Clayton Shiu from New York City…

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Disclaimer: The following is an actual transcript. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.  Due to the unique language of acupuncture, there will be errors, so we suggest you watch the video while reading the transcript.

…Creighton and a bachelor of science in human physiology from Boston university and a master of science with traditional Oriental medicine from psychology, went into medicine. He received his PhD in acupuncture, and moxibustion from the Tangi university of treaters, Chinese medicine, and completed as well as residency at the first teaching hospital of Tangie. Any of you that are joining us today. My note that this is the hospital in which the movie 9,000 year old takes place, and the Clayton were close to you with their father and modern acupuncture. His name is Dr. [inaudible], who is the inventor of a neuro rehabilitation medical. She now KHL, um, Dr. Hsu is the creator of the narrow punches stroke and neuro logical religious rehabilitation system that he teaches across the country. Dr. Sushi. I mean the, uh, the father of modern acupuncture, invited Clayton to present his breakthrough research and then a punctured system at the 2020 international acupuncture conference in change in China, Clayton holds faculty positions at the American Academy of Chinese culture, health sciences in Oakland, and at the American college of nutrition and Chinese medicine, teaching short rehabilitation courses for their doctoral program. Thank you for joining us today. Clayton, how are you doing?

I wanted that. I’m sorry. I blanked out a little bit. Yeah. Yeah. Um, okay. Uh, would you mind telling us about your experience doing a PhD in tangy or what was that like?

Oh, okay. Um, so my time in tangent was about three and a half years approximately. Um, it was a great experience. Um, it was, it’s a hospital facility that’s quite large. Uh, they treated about 10,000 stroke patients a day, um, as a whole. So we were able to really see all kinds of different kinds of cases. Um, everything from like, like full paralysis of the patient to seeing like a nasal tube being put into, um, the patient to help them feed and also seeing how acupuncture can even take a nasal tube out eventually and give the person the ability to swallow and chew food again. Um, so because of all the different wards and different buildings, um, you could find almost any kind of case, um, and kind of track how acupuncture over the long-term can actually treat and help the patient. And I think that was a major advantage of being in that environment, whereas quite often in our own private practices in the States, um, possibly even Canada too, like, you know, maybe we might see a patient for one week or two months at the most.

Um, and it’s not treating like these kinds of severe kind of cases, but in this case, at the tangent first teaching hospital, we can track patients over six months, eight months a year, et cetera. So it’s, it’s, it gives you a wider, bigger perspective on, on an arc of how a person can heal versus, you know, when we have a private practice, we think, Oh man, okay, maybe in six sessions, something should happen or not. And so my, my perspective on time and also, uh, frequency for treating, uh, certain neurological disorders changed a lot after being there. So

Yeah, it must have been great to be able to see it sort of firsthand the CMB applied every day. Um, I would imagine PA patients are admitted to the hospital and begin acupuncture immediately, right? There’s no waiting for six weeks before they’re discharged from our Western hospital before they come to our private practice. Right. And they’re doing acupuncture every day, maybe several times a day.

Yeah. They, um, at a hospital like this for probably getting treated like at least two sessions of acupuncture, two more sessions of physical therapy, moxa, um, you know, Twain off like, uh, herbal medicines, you know? So, so in a sense you’re getting treated like six to nine times a day, or you’re very active. You’re not very complacent basically. And I like the rooms are, uh, in certain words they’re very big. So like, you know, Chinese are very family oriented, so there’s there’s room for your whole family to kind of sit there, you know, and be loved. So it was very nice to see that too. Um, but yeah, and it was, it was great to see like different, um, like the different directors and specialists in each ward, they were good at different things. So you could, you could pick their brain and ask them, like, how would they needle something? Or why is, why are you using, you know, spleen six this way versus that way, you know, et cetera. Cause that’s a lot of the devil’s in the details, you know? So, um, you puncture, so yeah.

Was like amazing. I’m jealous. Okay. Um, so, um, tell us about your style called nano puncture. What if it’s possible in a few words or a few sentences to give us a nutshell one nano?

Sure. Um, so after I returned to the States, uh, um, I want to give the system of what I was doing. Um, like a kind of a different name. One is it’s a play on words because nano is like the smallest measurable unit in most cases. So it was a play on words of Tai Chi, right? Because Tigie could refer to the smallest or the largest, um, kind of measurement. So nano is referring to like that we’re simply using like needles and the acupuncture, but we can have a large effect to treat like paralysis or treats speech issues or treat, you know, pretty miraculous things. Whenever you see like acupuncture do a very spontaneous kind of changes someone that’s still fascinates me today. Um, and then the other word origin of nano puncture was I was, I was treating a very famous, uh, prostate surgeon and he didn’t believe in acupuncture at first.

And so when I treated him, he could feel me manipulate the needle and I basically converted him. And so, because he was doing sensories, right. He wouldn’t, he wouldn’t need to like the best deference, which was a very small right on a tissue. So he was the first surgeon that kind of related to what needles can do because this needles are a little bit smaller than ours, you know? And we were saying that, Oh, the instrument’s so small. It’s like, it’s like, nano-sized right. So, so that’s how we came up with the word nano puncture. So, so in a sense, nano is like the smallest, smallest unit. Right. Which is like the acupuncture versus reviewing like a major machine or a major, you know, device like a gamma, like a gamma Ray or something like that. So, you know, we’re using just the needles, we’re able to get like an amazing result. So yeah. So that’s that for that. Um, and then mix them with a training from can Jen has just 20 years of like sports medicine and orthopedic experience and stuff like that. So, so we gave it that label. Yeah.

Actually I’m glad you brought up like gamma knife and things like that. Because as part of the material that you teach you to teach something called photo biomodulation and I take it, that sounds a lot like star Trek to me, which sounds really exciting. I’m nothing wrong against dark trade. I’m a trache. So tell me about what that is. Sounds like full-time for Peters.

Okay.

Right. The photo biomodulation or, um, uh, could you repeat your question one time? Cause the, uh, the signal got a little slow.

Tell us what photobiomodulation is that, are you teaching your training program?

Sure. So, uh, what we like to do is even though we’re using, um, or using acupuncture and traditional needle manipulation methods, I like to combine modern technology with what I do. Um, it’s kind of the yin and yang to the practice. Uh, I do like photo biomodulation a lot because what, what sunlight is the chlorophyll red light is to the mitochondria of your cells. And so it’ll actually reset the P and bring energy and create energy into the cells of your body. So interestingly enough, for, for, for us as humans or animals, or, uh, or what have you like, we, we have tissue, right. And if you take this flash like off my cell phone, right. So this is every color in the spectrum, but if I put my finger over it, okay. Like this, right. You see a red light. Okay. And the reason why is that wavelength is about 610, uh, nanometer wavelength.

And that is the wavelength of the red wavelength color. And the red wavelength color is the color of light that can penetrate through our flesh into our muscles, which is what photo biomodulation uses. So that red light okay. Passes through human flesh into the tissue, into the cells. And so with photobiomodulation you can now pulse the frequency to adjust to things like gamma, brainwaves, or Delta brainwaves. You can, you can actually, um, increase the wavelength up to 700, 800 or near infrared light. Um, and when you do that, the neuron for infrared light spectrum will actually kill the viruses, including COVID. That’s why a lot of our devices today have like, you know, the cell phone, cleaner box or the air cleaner with the UV light, you know, and that’s, and that’s not a new thing. Anyone that has surgery before they do any surgery or down to work, they always flash a UV light device to actually prepare the room.

So,

Um, so that’s, so what we do is we use photobiomodulation, we will put it in a tissue that’s maybe we knew we activated the nerves of that body, but we know the tissue isn’t is still weak and fatigued, so we can use red light that way. Um, there’s also devices that go into the nose, right. Or into the tongue area. And what happens is because of the cranial nerves, like cranium, or, um, like the old factory created owner and the nerves attached to the hypoglossal, you can simulate that rather than help, but speech and also with memory. So for like all commerce patients, there’s a great device called the V light, which there’ll be like a headset and like a little stimulator that stimulates gamma, um, for the speech, right. Gamma, wavelength, and then a nose clip. And the clip will shine into that, that area of the factoring of that has like thousands of little Villa.

Okay. And when I’ve, when I worked for end, that it’s actually helped patients, who’ve had like, uh, dementia and memory fog where actually seen noticeable improvements, you know, and that’s a great device it’s shining off, you know, a red light wavelength, um, up through the nose. So, so the great thing about, yeah, and it works great with acupuncture. So like, whereas acupuncture can move CHAM, blood, right. Things like red light and OXA charges, the blood gives it energy. Do you see what I mean? So one thing creates like the flow, the other thing creates, like in a sense, um, like March she, for that blood or for that tissue. So

Do you have a preference of doing, uh photobiomodulation first and then acupuncture or vice versa? Do you do them at the same session or the patients come in separate sessions for different modalities?

Oh, no. I always do acupuncture and like a full neurological assessment first, and then we decide if they need, um, photobiomodulation um, and the, you know, the thing is, is even though it’s great for like, if you have lower back pain, if what I can tell you is that if you have more of a pinpoint lower back pain, or if, you know, it’s affecting the disc, I would use acupuncture first and then do the photo biomodulation to follow up, uh, because acupuncture is still extremely precise. Um, and then once you get that flow, it’s good to have that. So we have like, would you have a light bag? We have the region pod at my office. Um, so we, what we did was created like a rejuvenation studio. So we may have, like, we may have taken acupuncture to a certain extent. And then we feel like, okay, we know everything is rewired and plugged in together, but you know, the power sources and high enough still send them a sample. Yeah. Like let’s, let’s use, use the red light or let’s use like give the person energy, you know? So then we may say, try to do like 10 sessions of red light and then come back. We’re gonna reevaluate. Um, yeah. And, and the interesting thing is, uh, photobiomodulation will actually work on the digestive system. It’s not just for muscles and tendons. Um, we’ve had people had, um, digestive issues and swelling or water retention and a lot of dampness and the red light actually works. Photobiomodulation works great for that. So

Cool. And I like your analogy. Um, you have to make sure things are connected properly first, before you try to turn off the power, right. There’s no point trying to power. It is not connected. So to that, presumably through acupuncture, we’re reducing the resistance of the, um, of the nervous system. So now we have greater flow, right. That’s resistance or more or more conductivity. Now, once that groundwork is done, now it’s ready to actually get some sort of tonification from the F for the red light. Then did I read, I can actually go somewhere and do do the things that it’s intended to do to help you understand. Thank you very much for that. Um, can you tell us, you know, um, how, how can acupunctures, um, benefit from learning from you or learning from, um, nano puncture?

Um, well, I think what I do is we do give like neuro anatomy lessons and education on what a stroke concussion or traumatic brain injury is. But what we do is I set them a [inaudible] program that I did from 10 and two different modules. So, um, what we’d like to do is bring back a lot of the classical knee manipulation, um, so that, you know, you can, you can manipulate something with your needle and also get like the different, like, effects that I learned through [inaudible] or, you know, if we need like heart one, we, you can feel, and you can even direct it into each finger, like the sensation of, of the nerve and stuff like that. So we train you on how to do that. Um, so we might take a section of the body, like the arm or the leg, and for one weekend for about 16 hours or, you know, more you’re constantly practicing and needling mix them with, um, I’ll invite, like just, I’ve never met and I’ll demonstrate how I would approach them in front of the crowd, so of acupuncturists.

So we, we treat them together, but I like to, I think there’s a lot of little details, um, even just, even just down to positioning. Right. And I know like your work is amazing with, within the Academy and dissection and stuff, and, you know, if you don’t position the body correctly, we can’t needle. Right. We can’t get into that sweet spot to manipulate the Meridian and the nerves and the tissue. So it’s, uh, I think that takes like, almost like, uh, like committed, coordinated group practice. It’s like, it’s like when you join a, like a tiger group and everyone’s trying to do form at the same time, you know, and right. One bird was done in one minute, the other people are done in 10 minutes and you, you tend to reverberate together. And so you can feel, you know, the training and what you have to do to the concussion part of it. And then there’s the hands-on part that I think makes our modules special. Yeah.

Can you share with us like a very memorable patient or a case where you, you know, um, feel that you couldn’t have helped them as well as you could, or her as well as you could have had, you know, incorporated let’s put about modulation or Chanel K char or something, some of the things that you’ve learned in China, or some of the things that you discover yourself, you know, private practice,

You mean, like was difficult. And then when we tried that technique and it made it work or something like that, like yeah.

Something inspiring for us. I never get tired of listening to those success stories.

Right, right. Um, yeah, I think, I think, uh, so there, there is quite a few patients, um, that, like, one of my things I left to do is, uh, speech and speech paralysis and dysphasia. And we, you know, we had a patient who, uh, had a very severe stroke about three years ago. And, um, he was, you know, he had salivation problems. It has salivation problems, he’s in a wheelchair. And, um, it’s a difficult case for anybody to treat basically. But at the same time, like just kept putting in different points, like non [inaudible] and angled correctly, like GB, Toni, and long glues, like [inaudible] and stuff now. And when it came close to, uh, to the election time, right. And this patient is usually he always like this, he’s kind of like his eyes are closed, you know, he’s very quiet. Right. And we would treat them twice a day. Like he stays at my office all day and we treat them twice with about a three hour window in between. But about like four weeks ago, when it came close to election time, you know, we asked them who, who we should vote, or, you know, he’s lying there and just goes by them like that, you know, like that,

Yeah. It was like the first word he spoken in our office that was like, you know, cause, uh, you know, it wasn’t a yes or no question. It was something you had to think about. And then later it kept going and we asked him, well, who should run for president? And he said, Dr. Shoe. Right. So we were like, like he could cognitively had a sense of humor. Right. Like he could put that together. So after that, and my staff were like, we just have mocks on the neck. We kept doing all this stuff in the brainstem. And, um, yeah. So it was, uh, it was pretty cool. So it was, you know,

Maybe, maybe you can sit in a nomination for you to become the surgeon general [inaudible] yeah.

Yeah.

Would you be able, um, to give us some tips or advisors, some simple technique or insight, uh, from your unconscious system so that maybe we can start applying a little bit. I know it’s not something that we can really learn over a webinar, but if, is there anything you can, any of tips and advice at the thing I, myself and our viewers would be very appreciated.

Yeah. I think, um, no matter which system you’re using, um, one of the things like Dr. Sherwin says is, uh, he was famous for, for using the principle or creating the principle of quantitative manipulation. Right. So, and what that means is is every 10 minutes we would do a technique like Sparrow pecking, or Phoenix flapping their wings on plants like neg Juan or Sonia and chow because he knew, and he could tell that like every 10 minutes you have to re stimulate the nerves. So my advice is like, it doesn’t matter if you’re using [inaudible] or not whatever technique it is. Like I would go back, we’ll just leave your patient there for like 30 minutes or 40 minutes or whatever, like every 10 minutes go back and just touch that needle. Uh, give it a little adjustment, no matter what your technique is, you know?

And then you’re going to see like a more drastic change in results because, because maybe the body responded that it plateaus and during the session, you can peak it back up. You know? So that’s something that he was very strict about. Like everybody knew that in this hospital, it was very interesting. And I knew that when, uh, one of the hospitals only had 200 beds, he would, like, I heard he would run out of the office, make sure someone manipulated the needle correctly, then run back to his, like, you know, to his conference. He was very strict on that. Yeah. And then also just trying to take care of your hands, whether you’re practicing Tai-Chi or sword work or something, like treat your hands, like they’re gold because, uh, you know, they’re your instruments, right? So you want to make sure you’re always like, you know, don’t, don’t just neglect them and, you know, leave them on a table somewhere, but treat your hand really good and keep them like help because when they’re helping and supple and soft, you can, you can get better results too. You can be more sensitive and it increases your, your tingly, which is like your listening skill, like the needle. So yeah.

To touch detention, the, uh, advisor about, um, sort of re stimulating the needles every 10 minutes or so she didn’t give us an idea, like what they’re doing, kind of w or in your practice that you saw, um, like how long was the average, uh, stroke. We have acupuncture session. And then within that timeframe, how many times are they going into re-stimulate?

Yeah, so, uh, I would say like the, the average time takes about probably about 45 minutes to like an hour for a stroke patient, because you’re going to treat the front for about 20 minutes and then the back for 20 minutes or a specific part of the body. Right. And then you should be like every 10, 15 minutes, you should be going back to manipulate the session. We usually say that like, one course of treatment would be 30 sessions at that hospital. Right. But a lot of patients in the word I was in, um, it was like an international word. So like patients who were living in that hospital for, for like several months, like they, they were getting in a special program, you know? Um, so, you know, in terms of like, it was very congruent to what we say about neuroplasticity. If you think about like, you know, we, usually we say, right, but if, if something’s pretty severely damaged, like if there is damage to the brain STEM or to some of the upper motor tracks, you know, you’re looking at 20 or 30 sessions.

And I think the important thing why I’m glad you’re a teacher and, and other of our peers are teaching, this is because, you know, this isn’t like spraining an ankle new, you need to explain to the patient a care plan and figure out, um, how long, and realistically it would take for them to recover this. That’s not going to be done in five sessions and five quick sessions, like, you know, um, so it’s important that you can guide and manage the patient on the law through that process. So, yeah, I mean, one of the inspirational stories is, uh, I want to add to that is like, for instance, uh, there’s a patient, um, and his name is Jim Wharton and he was the, he was the creator of active, isolated stretching. He’s he coached many Olympic athletes and runners. Right. And he had a stroke, uh, uh, about a year ago.

And he came into my office about a month after the stroke. And he was, he completely could not move. Um, you know, he had a gastric tube and everything he couldn’t speak. And I can tell you that one year later. Okay. Because it was a very severe stroke. Uh, well, within six months he was already eating without a gastric tube and he’s a healthy guy to amazing specimen person. But one year later he was riding the train, the subway train, and he gave me a stretching session. So he treated me instead of I treated him. Right. And it was amazing. Yes. But realistically,

Yeah, yeah. A year is nothing compared to having to get your life back. Right. I mean, it’s all, it’s all relative. Um, right. Thank you very much for sharing your experience with us about an Ana puncture before, if our listeners and viewers find out more information, do you have a website or some social media information? You can let us know so we can get in touch with you or get more information about your upcoming training sessions.

Sure. Um, it’s an amateur seminar doc. Um, and my clinic website is, is, uh, the shoe clinic.com too. So, uh, we’re gonna, we’re going to create some, um, new, online format so people can start learning the different modules. I’m teaching again. Um, cause of Irvin can’t really, um, easily meet face to face, but we’re going to create, we’re going to do the academic portions. And then later we’re going to have like group, uh, when everything is more in control, we’ll have like a group practical time too. So, but yeah, we plan to put a lot of the modules. And so it’ll be like upper extremity, lower extremity, speech paralysis, uh, concussion, like, um, but the first one will probably be the base. We call it the, the, the classical, uh, points, or I actually caught them. They’re all flash. So, because I believe the Chenelle

Cocho points, everyone should know and know how to manipulate so that at least you have something in your toolbox, but yeah. So we’re going to have that coming up in 2021. So yeah, very excited. Thank you very much, Clayton. It’s been awesome talking to you and for our listeners, don’t forget to join us next week. We’re going to have another exciting show with my cohost, Virginia Doran. Thank you. And take care.

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